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Spatial representation during occlusion.
Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91470OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-91470DiVA: diva2:164208
Available from: 2004-03-12 Created: 2004-03-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Infants’ Knowledge of Occluded Objects: Evidence of Early Spatiotemporal Representations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infants’ Knowledge of Occluded Objects: Evidence of Early Spatiotemporal Representations
2004 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis demonstrates that infants represent temporarily non-visible, or occluded, objects. From 4 months of age, infants could accurately predict the reappearance of a moving object after 660 ms of non visibility; indicating accurate spatiotemporal representations. At this age predictions were dominated by associations between specific events and outcomes (associative rules). Between 6 and 8 months of age predictions became dominated by extrapolations (Study III). From 6 months infants could represent occluded objects for up to 4 seconds. The number of successful predictions decreased, however, if the information contained in the occlusion event diminished (time of accretion and deletion). As infants grew older (up to 12 months) they produced more accurate predictions. (Study II). The similarities between adult and infant performances were numerous (Study I). These conclusion are based on one cross sectional (Study I) and two longitudinal studies (Study II & III) in which an object, a ‘happy face’, moved on circular (Study I, II, & III) and other complex trajectories (Study III). One portion of each trajectory was covered by a screen that blocked the object from sight. In each study participants gaze were recorded with an infrared eye tracking system (ASL 504) and a magnetic head tracker (Flock of Birds). This data was combined with data from the stimulus and stored for of line analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2004. 64 p.
Series
Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 0282-7492 ; 134
Keyword
Psychology, infants, occlusion, gaze, object representations, temporal, spatial, associative rule, extrapolation, Psykologi
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-4058 (URN)91-554-5898-X (ISBN)
Public defence
2004-04-14, Sal X, Universitetshuset, Uppsala, 10:15
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2004-03-12 Created: 2004-03-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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