uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Key Principles for User-Centred Systems Design
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology.
Show others and affiliations
2003 In: Behaviour & Information Technology, Vol. 22, no 6, 397 – 409- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 22, no 6, 397 – 409- p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93523OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-93523DiVA: diva2:167022
Funder
Available from: 2005-09-30 Created: 2005-09-30 Last updated: 2010-11-22Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. A Fine Balance: Addressing Usability and Users’ Needs in the Development of IT Systems for the Workplace
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Fine Balance: Addressing Usability and Users’ Needs in the Development of IT Systems for the Workplace
2005 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

IT systems with poor usability are a serious problem in many workplaces. Many workers, particularly office workers, spend a large part of their workday at the computer, and usability problems can cause frustration and impact negatively on productivity. This thesis discusses some of the problems associated with addressing usability and users’ needs in IT systems development.

Usability issues and users’ needs are often marginalised or even abandoned in systems development. Technical issues and deadlines are given precedence, while usability activities and user activities are cut back or cancelled. Research shows that there are various obstacles to usability and user involvement, including difficulties with understanding the usability concept, insufficient usability expertise and a lack of time and resources.

This thesis presents a number of studies that look at the problem from different angles. The main question is why usability and users’ needs are marginalised in bespoke systems development, where IT systems are built for a specific work context. The research presented in this thesis also addresses user-centred systems design as a way of integrating usability issues and users’ needs into systems development. The thesis concludes with a discussion about different ways of viewing and representing the users’ work: the systems theoretical view and the view of work as a social process. The former emphasises the formal aspects of work and views users as components in an overall system, whereas the latter focuses on work as a social process and people as active agents. The discussion concludes with the argument that the conflict between these two views is played out in the systems development process, which may help explain some of the difficulties that arise when working with usability and users’ needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2005. 85 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 95
Keyword
human-computer interaction, usability, usability professional, usability practitioner, user-centred design, user-centred systems design, IT systems development
National Category
Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-5947 (URN)91-554-6353-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2005-10-21, 1211, Hus 1, Polacksbacken, MIC, Uppsala, 13:15
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2005-09-30 Created: 2005-09-30 Last updated: 2013-07-03Bibliographically approved
2. Usability – Who Cares?: The Introduction of User-Centred Systems Design in Organisations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Usability – Who Cares?: The Introduction of User-Centred Systems Design in Organisations
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis analyses the difficulties encountered in the promotion of usability, especially in relation to occupation health issues, when developing IT systems in a public authority. It examines what happens when User-Centred Systems Design (UCSD) approaches are introduced to organisations with in-house systems development for their employees. It studies how stakeholder values affect the outcomes in terms of usability, occupational health, and institutional acceptance. Moreover, new methods are examined and evaluated as potential tools for assisting the adoption of UCSD. These methods are for example Field studies for system developers, Usability coaching for stakeholders and Management views of usability.

A stated aim is to influence systems development in practice. Hence an action research paradigm has been employed, carrying out research and change in real life settings, gathering and analysing data using qualitative techniques.

This thesis is based on a constructivist perspective, where theories in the areas of learning and organisational change have been used in order to better understand the research questions.

The research demonstrates that most people are enthusiastic to, and interested in, UCSD with a focus on the computerised work environment. Many of the stakeholder groups, such as managers, users, project managers and system developers, changed their construct of identity as well as practice when UCSD was introduced.

However, this research shows that there are several values that affect systems development and hinder usability work. These include for example value of rationality and objectivity, and differing values and perspectives underpinning descriptions and discourse on work and systems development. Values such as automation, efficiency, and customer satisfaction shape the development of new technology, and ultimately the tasks, work practices integrated in IT systems.

Moreover, the results demonstrate that even though many consider usability as important, few take active responsibility for it, as the title of this thesis suggests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2010. 121 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 740
Keyword
User-Centred System Design, UCSD, Human-Computer Interaction, HCI, Usability, Perspectives, Sensemaking, Communities of Practice, Action research, Interpretations, Organisational change, Work environment, IT systems development
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122387 (URN)978-91-554-7797-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-05-26, Room 2446, Polacksbacken, Lägerhyddsvägen 2D, Uppsala, 13:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-05-05 Created: 2010-04-11 Last updated: 2014-06-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Authority records BETA

Göransson, Bengt

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Göransson, Bengt
By organisation
Department of Information Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 669 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf