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Links between bacterial production, amino acid utilization and community composition in productive lakes
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
2007 (English)In: ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 1, no 6, 532-544 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Influence of distribution and abundance of bacterial taxa on ecosystem function are poorly understood for natural microbial communities. We related 16S rRNA-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism to bacterial production and arginine uptake kinetics to test if functional features of bacterioplankton in four lakes could be predicted from community composition. Maximum arginine uptake rate (arginine Vmax) ranged from 10% to 100% of bacterial production. Owing to high growth efficiencies on arginine (63–77%), the bacterial community could potentially saturate its carbon demand using this single organic substrate, for example, during sudden surges of free amino acids. However, due to low in situ concentrations of arginine in these lakes (<0.9 g l-1), actual uptake rates at ambient concentrations rarely exceeded 10% of Vmax. Bacterial production and arginine Vmax could be predicted from a subset of bacterial ribotypes, tentatively affiliated with several bacterial divisions (Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria). Multivariate statistical analysis indicates that there were both highly important and less important ribotypes for the prediction of bacterial production and arginine Vmax. These populations were either negatively or positively related to the respective functional feature, indicating contrasting ecological roles. Our study provides a statistically robust demonstration that, apart from environmental conditions, patterns in bacterial community composition can also be used to predict lake ecosystem function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 1, no 6, 532-544 p.
Keyword [en]
amino-acid utilization, bacteria, community composition, lakes, production
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95274DOI: 10.1038/ismej.2007.64ISI: 000250232700007PubMedID: 18043654OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-95274DiVA: diva2:169431
Available from: 2006-12-20 Created: 2006-12-20 Last updated: 2011-01-20Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The Niches of Bacterial Populations in Productive Waters: Examples from Coastal Waters and Four Eutrophic Lakes
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Niches of Bacterial Populations in Productive Waters: Examples from Coastal Waters and Four Eutrophic Lakes
2006 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Recent research in microbial ecology has focused on how aquatic bacterial communities are assembled. Only a few of these studies follow a “Gleasonian” approach where the roles of single bacterial populations are in focus. In this thesis, novel molecular tools were used to describe the distribution and evolutionary relationships of microbes in productive aquatic environments. Many new phylogenetic groups of bacteria were identified, likely representing bacterial populations restricted to productive freshwaters. I also addressed the dynamics and functional role of individual bacterial populations in eutrophic lakes and brackish environments with a focus on either biogeochemically significant or potentially pathogenic representatives. Flavobacteria blooms were observed, on occasions characterized by high heterotrophic production. In addition to high temporal dynamics microbial community composition and function differed on the spatial scale, as exemplified by free-living and Cyanobacteria-associated habitats. At the community scale, microbial processes, such as biomass production and substrate uptake could be predicted from the presence and absence of individual bacterial populations. I also studied the niches of potentially pathogenic Vibrio populations in various coastal waters. Using a novel culture-independent method, a V. cholerae population was detected along the entire Swedish coastline. Results from an environmental survey and a laboratory mesocosm experiment reveal that phytoplankton-derived dissolved organic matter enhance the growth of V. cholerae and other Vibrio spp. and hence create a largely overlooked niche for these heterotrophic bacteria. This thesis and future work on the role of individual bacterial populations will facilitate predictions of biogeochemical cycles and the distribution of bacteria in the context of global climate change and local eutrophication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2006. 68 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 254
Keyword
Ecology, diversity, 16S rRNA, phytoplankton, bloom, pathogen, carbon cycle, Ekologi
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-7419 (URN)91-554-6760-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2007-01-19, Ekmansalen, EBC (Evolutionary Biology Center), Uppsala, 10:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2006-12-20 Created: 2006-12-20 Last updated: 2016-04-28Bibliographically approved

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Bertilsson, StefanEiler, AlexanderNordqvist, Anneli

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