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Peak exercise capacity estimated from incremental shuttle walking test in patients with COPD: A methodological study
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
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2006 (English)In: Respiratory research (Online), ISSN 1465-9921, E-ISSN 1465-993X, Vol. 7, 127- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In patients with COPD, both laboratory exercise tests and field walking tests are used to assess physical performance. In laboratory tests, peak exercise capacity in watts ( W peak) and/or peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) are assessed, whereas the performance on walking tests usually is expressed as distance walked. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between an incremental shuttle walking test (ISWT) and two laboratory cycle tests in order to assess whether W peak could be estimated from an ISWT.

Methods: Ninety-three patients with moderate or severe COPD performed an ISWT, an incremental cycle test (ICT) to measure W peak and a semi-steady-state cycle test with breath-by-breath gas exchange analysis (CPET) to measure VO2 peak. Routine equations for conversion between cycle tests were used to estimate W peak from measured VO2 peak (CPET). Conversion equation for estimation of W peak from ISWT was found by univariate regression.

Results: There was a significant correlation between W peak and distance walked on ISWT x body weight (r=0.88, p<0.0001). The agreement between W peak measured by ICT and estimated from ISWT was similar to the agreement between measured W peak (ICT) and W peak estimated from measured VO2 peak by CPET.

Conclusion: Peak exercise capacity measured by an incremental cycle test could be estimated from an ISWT with similar accuracy as when estimated from peak oxygen uptake in patients with COPD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 7, 127- p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95527DOI: 10.1186/1465-9921-7-127ISI: 000241880600001PubMedID: 17044921OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-95527DiVA: diva2:169781
Available from: 2007-03-08 Created: 2007-03-08 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Physical Training and Testing in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Training and Testing in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The overall aims of the studies were to investigate the effects of different training modalities on exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with moderate or severe COPD and, further, to explore two of the physical tests used in pulmonary rehabilitation.

In study I, the 12-minute walking distance (12MWD) did not increase on retesting in patients with exercise-induced hypoxemia (EIH) whereas 12MWD increased significantly on retesting in the non-EIH patients. In study II, we found that the incremental shuttle walking test was as good a predictor of peak exercise capacity (W peak) as peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) is. In study III, we investigated the effects of two different combination training programmes when training twice a week for eight weeks. One programme was mainly based on endurance training (group A) and the other on resistance training and callisthenics (group B). W peak and 12MWD increased in group A but not in group B. HRQoL, anxiety and depression were unchanged in both groups. Ratings of perceived exertion at rest were significantly lower in group A than in group B after training and during 12 months of follow-up. Twelve months post-training, 12MWD was back to baseline in group A, but significantly shorter than at baseline in group B. Thus, a short endurance training intervention delayed decline in 12MWD for at least one year. Patients with moderate and severe COPD responded to training in the same way. In study IV, both interval and continuous endurance training increased W peak, VO2 peak, peak exhaled carbon dioxide (VCO2 peak) and 12MWD. Likewise, HRQoL, dyspnoea during activities of daily life, anxiety and depression improved similarly in both groups. At a fixed, submaximal workload (isotime), the interval training reduced oxygen cost and ventilatory demand significantly more than the continuous training did.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2007. 86 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 234
Keyword
Physical therapy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary rehabilitation, physical training, endurance training, interval training, health-related quality of life, exercise testing, walking tests, physiotherapy, Sjukgymnastik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-7632 (URN)978-91-554-6815-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2007-03-31, Grönwallsalen, Akademiska sjukhuset, ingång 70, Uppsala, 09:15
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Available from: 2007-03-08 Created: 2007-03-08 Last updated: 2013-05-23Bibliographically approved

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Emtner, MargaretaHedenström, HansBoman, Gunnar

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