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Fear of snakes and facial ractions:: A case of rapid emotional responding
Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
1988 In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 39, no 2, 75-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1988. Vol. 39, no 2, 75-80 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-96235OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-96235DiVA: diva2:170739
Available from: 2007-09-28 Created: 2007-09-28Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Rapid Facial Reactions to Emotionally Relevant Stimuli
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid Facial Reactions to Emotionally Relevant Stimuli
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The present thesis investigated the relationship between rapid facial muscle reactions and emotionally relevant stimuli. In Study I, it was demonstrated that angry faces elicit increased Corrugator supercilii activity, whereas happy faces elicit increased Zygomaticus major activity, as early as within the first second after stimulus onset. In Study II, during the first second of exposure, pictures of snakes elicited more corrugator activity than pictures of flowers. However, this effect was apparent only for female participants. Study III showed that participants high as opposed to low in fear of snakes respond with increased corrugator activity, as well as increased autonomic activity, when exposed to pictures of snakes. In Study IV, participants high as opposed to low in speech anxiety responded with a larger difference in corrugator responding between angry and happy faces, and also with a larger difference in zygomatic responding between happy and angry faces, indicating that people high in speech anxiety have an exaggerated facial responsiveness to social stimuli. In summary, the present results show that the facial EMG technique is sensitive to detecting rapid emotional reactions to different emotionally relevant stimuli (human faces and snakes). Additionally, they demonstrate the existence of differences in rapid facial reactions among groups for which the emotional relevance of the stimuli can be considered to differ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Universitetsbiblioteket, 2007. 59 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 30
Keyword
Emotion, facial EMG, facial reactions, facial expressions, rapid responses, automatic responses, phobia, social fear, speech anxiety
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-8219 (URN)978-91-554-6972-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2007-10-19, Sal IX, Universitetshuset, Uppsala, 10:15
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2007-09-28 Created: 2007-09-28Bibliographically approved

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