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Teaching Musical Expression: Effects of production and delivery of feedback by teacher vs. computer on rated feedback quality
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2009 (English)In: Music Education Research, ISSN 1461-3808, E-ISSN 1469-9893, Vol. 11, no 2, 175-191 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has shown that a computer program may improve performers' abilities to express emotions through their performance. Yet performers seem reluctant to embrace this novel technology. In this study we explored possible reasons for these negative impressions. Eighty guitarists performed a piece of music to express various emotions, received feedback on their performances, and judged the quality of the feedback they received on rating scales. In a 2 x 2 between-subjects factorial design, we manipulated (a) the performers’ belief about whether the feedback was produced by a teacher or a computer program (feedback delivery) and (b) the feedback contents in terms of whether they were really produced by a teacher or a computer program (feedback production). Results revealed significant main effects of both production and delivery, but no interaction between the two. That is, the mere belief that the feedback derived from a teacher yielded higher quality ratings, but so did also feedback that did indeed derive from a teacher. While both types of feedback were rated as equally easy to understand, feedback from teachers was rated as more detailed. Additional analyses revealed that teacher-produced feedback was appreciated because it offered encouragement, examples, and explanations. Implications for computer applications in music education are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 11, no 2, 175-191 p.
Keyword [en]
attitudes, computer, computer-assisted teaching, emotion, expression, feedback, music performance, teaching
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-96734DOI: 10.1080/14613800902924532ISI: 000268245900003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-96734DiVA: diva2:171408
Available from: 2008-02-19 Created: 2008-02-19 Last updated: 2010-12-28Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. A Novel Approach to Teaching Emotional Expression in Music Performance
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Novel Approach to Teaching Emotional Expression in Music Performance
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

One of the most important aspects of music performance is the expression of emotions, yet research has suggested that this skill is neglected in music education. The aim of this thesis was thus to develop and test a novel and empirically-based approach to teaching emotional expression in music performance.

Study I explored the nature of instrumental teaching in its natural context, with a focus on emotional expression. Although there were individual differences among teachers, a common feature was a lack of clear goals, specific tasks, systematic teaching patterns, and informative feedback.

Study II presented and tested a computer program that analyzes music performances and offers informative feedback, including specific suggestions on how to enhance the emotional expression. Performers were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (1) feedback from the computer program, (2) feedback from music teachers, and (3) repetition without feedback. The results indicated the greatest improvements in communication accuracy for the computer feedback group, but although the computer program was rated as easy to understand and use, performers did not want to use it in the future.

Study III explored whether the negative views towards the computer program were due to negative attitudes towards computers or a dislike of the characteristics of the actual feedback contents. Results from a deception experiment revealed that the mere belief that the feedback derived from a teacher yielded higher quality ratings, but so did also feedback that did indeed derive from a teacher. The latter feedback was perceived as more detailed.

The thesis shows that it is possible for performers to improve their abilities to express emotions through computer-assisted teaching, but suggests that the feedback may benefit from including human-like aspects such as encouragement, examples, and explanations in order to make it more attractive in the eyes of its potential users.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2008. 57 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 36
Keyword
Psychology, music performance, emotion, expression, feedback, computer-based teaching, music education, Psykologi
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-8456 (URN)978-91-554-7089-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-03-14, Sal IV, Universitetshuset, Uppsala, 10:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-02-19 Created: 2008-02-19Bibliographically approved

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Liljeström, SimonJuslin, Patrik N.

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