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Prenatal ultrasound scanning and the risk of schizophrenia and other psychoses
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Obstetrisk forskning/Axelsson)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Obstetrisk forskning/Axelsson)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Obstetrisk forskning/Axelsson)
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2007 (English)In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 18, no 5, 577-582 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Prenatal ultrasound exposure has been associated with increased prevalence of left-hand or mixed-hand preference, and has been suggested to affect the normal lateralization of the fetal brain. Atypical lateralization is more common in patients with schizophrenia. We evaluated possible associations of prenatal ultrasound with schizophrenia and other psychoses. METHODS: We identified a cohort of individuals born in Sweden 1973-1978. During this period, one Swedish hospital (Malmö University Hospital) performed prenatal ultrasound on a routine basis, and all individuals born at that hospital were considered exposed to ultrasound. Children born at hospitals where ultrasound was not used routinely or selectively were considered unexposed. We used Poisson regression analysis to estimate the effect of ultrasound exposure on the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. RESULTS: In all, 370,945 individuals were included in the study, of whom 13,212 were exposed to ultrasound. The exposed group demonstrated a tendency toward a higher risk of schizophrenia (among men, crude incidence rate ratio = 1.58 [95% confidence interval = 0.99-2.51]; among women, 1.26 [0.62-2.55]). However, men and women born in several of the 7 tertiary level hospitals without ultrasound scanning also had higher risks of schizophrenia compared with those born in other hospitals. For other psychoses there were no differences between groups. CONCLUSIONS: No clear associations between prenatal ultrasound exposure and schizophrenia or other psychoses were found. Other factors related to place of birth might have influenced the results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 18, no 5, 577-582 p.
Keyword [en]
Prenatal ultrasound, schizophrenia
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97111DOI: 10.1097/EDE.0b013e318126c102ISI: 000249000500009PubMedID: 17700245OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-97111DiVA: diva2:171908
Available from: 2008-04-25 Created: 2008-04-25 Last updated: 2011-01-26Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Prenatal Ultrasound and X-ray - Potentially Adverse Effects on the CNS
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prenatal Ultrasound and X-ray - Potentially Adverse Effects on the CNS
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim with this thesis was to assess the impact of prenatal ultrasound exposure on psychotic illness, childhood brain tumors (CBT) and school achievement, and to evaluate prenatal X-ray exposure and the risk of CBT.

In a cohort study, children born in Malmö 1973-1978, where prenatal ultrasound was used routinely, were considered exposed (n=13, 212) and children born at hospitals with no use of ultrasound, were considered unexposed (n=357,733). Exposed men had a tendency toward a higher risk of schizophrenia. For other psychoses there were no differences between groups. Other factors related to place of birth might have influenced the results.

In a case control study, children born 1975-1984 with a diagnosis of CBT (n=512), and randomly selected control children (n=524) were included. Exposure data on X-ray and ultrasound from antenatal records was completed with information from the Medical Birth Register. We found no overall increased risk for CBT after prenatal X-ray exposure. When stratifying by histological subgroups, primitive neuroectodermal tumors had the highest risk estimates. For ultrasound exposure, no increased risk for CBT was seen and numbers of examinations or gestational age at exposure had no substantial impact on the results.

In a follow-up of a randomized trial on prenatal ultrasound scanning 1985-87, we assessed the children’s school grades when graduating from primary school (15-16 years of age). We performed analyses according to randomization, ultrasound exposure in the second trimester and exposure at any time during pregnancy. There were no differences in school performance for boys or girls according to randomization or exposure in the second trimester. Boys exposed to ultrasound any time during fetal life had a reduced mean score in physical education and small, non-significant increased risk of poor school performance in general.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2008. 44 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 339
Keyword
Obstetrics and gynaecology, ultrasound, X-ray, fetus, risk, childhood cancer, schizophrenia, Obstetrik och kvinnosjukdomar
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-8666 (URN)978-91-554-7175-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-05-16, Rosénsalen, Ingång 95/96 nb, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, 13:15
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-04-25 Created: 2008-04-25Bibliographically approved

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