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Meningococcal outer membrane protein NhhA is essential for colonization and disease by preventing phagocytosis and complement attack
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
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2008 (English)In: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 76, no 11, 5412-5420 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of meningitis and septicemia worldwide, with a rapid onset of disease and a high morbidity and mortality. NhhA is a meningococcal outer membrane protein included in the family of trimeric autotransporter adhesins. The protein binds to the extracellular matrix proteins heparan sulfate and laminin and facilitates attachment to host epithelial cells. In this study, we show that NhhA is essential for bacterial colonization of the nasopharyngeal mucosa in a murine model of meningococcal disease. Successful colonization depends on bacterial attachment but also to the capacity to overcome innate host immune responses. We found that NhhA protected bacteria from phagocytosis, which is important for the mucosal survival of bacteria. In addition, NhhA mediated extensive serum resistance that increased bacterial survival in blood and promoted lethal sepsis. The presence of NhhA protected bacteria from complement-mediated killing by preventing the deposition of the membrane attack complex. Taken together, the results of this work reveal that NhhA inhibits phagocytosis and protects bacteria against complement-mediated killing, which enhances both nasal colonization and the development of sepsis in vivo.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 76, no 11, 5412-5420 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-98949DOI: 10.1128/IAI.00478-08ISI: 000260165500068PubMedID: 18794285OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-98949DiVA: diva2:201713
Available from: 2009-03-05 Created: 2009-03-05 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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