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People's attitudes and reactions to organ donation
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. (Health Services Research)
2006 (English)In: Mortality, ISSN 1357-6275, E-ISSN 1469-9885, Vol. 11, no 2, 133-50 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article is based on the author's previous studies on people's reactions to organ donation, including both questionnaire surveys and qualitative interviews. A model was developed where six anti-donation factors and two pro-donation factors influence the attitude toward organ donation. This model can be applied also to other procedures with the dead body such as autopsy, anatomical dissection, and burial. Two-thirds of the adult population recognise some discomfort concerning organ donation though they are positive to transplantation per se and want to obtain a transplant themselves if in need. The most common discomfort is “Illusion of lingering life,” which means that it is difficult to imagine a difference between the living and the dead body and that procedures with a corpse are perceived as conducted on a living body. However, for the majority, the discomfort is an initial reaction that dissolves when put against altruistic and fact-stressing arguments. Teenagers are less willing to donate organs and feel more discomfort than adults, especially concerning trespassing the borders of identity by becoming a part of another individual through a donated organ. The findings of these studies can help medical staff to approach relatives of a potential donor in an empathic way and also have implications for donation campaigns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 11, no 2, 133-50 p.
Keyword [en]
attitudes, reactions, organ donation, death anxiety, brain death
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-102452DOI: 10.1080/13576270600615351OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-102452DiVA: diva2:216166
Available from: 2009-05-17 Created: 2009-05-07 Last updated: 2010-05-26Bibliographically approved

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Sanner, Margareta

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