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Evolution of vertebrate rod and cone phototransduction genes
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology. (Larhammar)
School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005, Australia . (Larhammar)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology. (Larhammar)
2009 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, Vol. 364, no 1531, 2867-2880 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vertebrate cones and rods in several cases use separate but related components for their signal transduction (opsins, G-proteins, ion channels, etc.). Some of these proteins are also used differentially in other cell types in the retina. Because cones, rods and other retinal cell types originated in early vertebrate evolution, it is of interest to see if their specific genes arose in the extensive gene duplications that took place in the ancestor of the jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) by two tetraploidizations (genome doublings). The ancestor of teleost fishes subsequently underwent a third tetraploidization. Our previously reported analyses showed that several gene families in the vertebrate visual phototransduction cascade received new members in the basal tetraploidizations. We here expand these data with studies of additional gene families and vertebrate species. We conclude that no less than 10 of the 13 studied phototransduction gene families received additional members in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations. Also the remaining three families seem to have undergone duplications during the same time period but it is unclear if this happened as a result of the tetraploidizations. The implications of the many early vertebrate gene duplications for functional specialization of specific retinal cell types, particularly cones and rods, are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 364, no 1531, 2867-2880 p.
Keyword [en]
gene duplication, tetraploidization, eye, retina, phototransduction, opsin
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-105024DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2009.0077ISI: 000269378800007PubMedID: 19720650OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-105024DiVA: diva2:220356
Available from: 2009-05-31 Created: 2009-05-31 Last updated: 2012-10-03Bibliographically approved

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Larhammar, DanNordström, Karin

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