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Subjective social status and shaming experiences in relation to adolescent depression
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
2009 (English)In: Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, ISSN 1072-4710, E-ISSN 1538-3628, Vol. 163, no 1, 55-60 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate associations between social status, shaming experiences and adolescent depression by the use of a status-shaming model.

Design: Population-based self-report cohort study.

Setting: Västmanland, Sweden.

Participants: A cohort of 5396 students in grade nine (15-16 years old) and second year of high school (17-18 years old).

Intervention: Participants completed the anonymous questionnaire Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland - 2006 (SALVe 2006) during class hours.

Outcome Measures: We investigated prevalence of depression according to DSRS (DSM IV, A-criterion), in relation to subjective social status, shaming experiences, and social background factors. Social status was measured in two ways - attributed status of a family’s socioeconomic and social standing, and acquired status of peer group and school. Binary logistic regressions were used for the analyses.

Results: Shaming experiences and low social status interacted in relation to depression. If shaming experiences were present, participants with both high and low attributed status showed an elevated risk for depression (OR 5.4-6.9), whereas medium status seemed to have a protective function. For acquired status, the highest elevated risk was found among participants with low status (OR 6.7-8.6).

Conclusions: It is possible that a person’s social status may influence the risk for depression when subjected to shaming experiences. The study contributes to the mapping of the influence of social status on health, and may have essential implications in the understanding, prevention and treatment of adolescent depression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 163, no 1, 55-60 p.
Keyword [en]
social status, shame, adolescence, depression
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Child and Youth Psychiatry; Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109847DOI: 10.1001/archpedi.163.1.55ISI: 000262179000009PubMedID: 19124704OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-109847DiVA: diva2:274224
Available from: 2009-10-27 Created: 2009-10-27 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Depression and Antisocial Behaviour in Adolescents: Influence of Social Status, Shaming, and Gene-Environment Interaction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depression and Antisocial Behaviour in Adolescents: Influence of Social Status, Shaming, and Gene-Environment Interaction
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis investigated (1) social status and shaming experiences in relation to aggressive behaviour and depression, and (2) gene-environment interactions between two genetic polymorphisms related to the serotonergic system – MAOA-VNTR and 5HTTLPR – and experiences of maltreatment in relation to delinquent behaviour and depression among adolescents.

The four included studies are based on questionnaire data from the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland 2006 (SALVe-2006). A total of 5396 students in 9th (15-16 years old) grade of elementary school and 2nd (17-18 years old) grade of high school comprised the target population. The students in 2nd grade of high school also provided a saliva sample for gene extraction.

There were strong associations between shaming experiences and both aggressive behaviour and depression. In addition, individuals who reported many shaming experiences and had either low or high social status had increased risks of physical aggression or depression, whereas medium social status seemed to have a protective effect.

Gene-environment interactions were found between experiences of maltreatment and the MAOA-VNTR in relation to delinquent behaviour. Moreover, the direction of the gene-environment interaction differed depending on sex: boys with the short (S) variant of the MAOA-VNTR, in contrast to girls with the long (LL) variant, had the highest risk of delinquency in combination with maltreatment.

Gene-environment interactions were also found between experiences of maltreatment and the 5HTTLPR in relation to depression among girls. The girls that were homozygous for the S allele (SS) had the highest risk of depression in combination with maltreatment. Among boys however, no gene-environment interaction was found between the 5HTTLPR and maltreatment in relation to depression.

In conclusion, it is important to consider both genetic effects, and psychosocial factors such as social status, shaming experiences, and experiences of maltreatment when investigating different aspects of health and behaviour among adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2009. 100 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 494
Keyword
adolescent, antisocial behaviour, depression, gene-environment interaction, maltreatment, monoamine oxidase, serotonin, shame, social status
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Child and Youth Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109851 (URN)978-91-554-7649-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-12-10, Samlingssalen Psykiatricentrum, Ing 29, Centrallasarettet, Västerås, 13:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-12-01 Created: 2009-10-27 Last updated: 2009-12-01Bibliographically approved

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