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Democracy and Mediation in Territorial Civil Wars in Southeast Asia and the South Pacific
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. (Uppsala konfliktdataprogram)
University of Alabama.
University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. (Uppsala konfliktdataprogram)
2009 (English)In: Asia Europe Journal: Intercultural Studies in the Social Sciences and Humanities, ISSN 1610-2932, E-ISSN 1612-1031, Vol. 7, no 2, 241-264 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The awarding of the 2008 Nobel Peace Prize to former President Martti Ahtisaari, Finland, cites his involvement in the settlement of the Aceh conflict. This at the same time highlights the lack of such efforts in the regions of Southeast Asia and the South Pacific. While internal conflicts throughout the world often tend to be resilient to conflict management initiatives, conflicts in the Asia-Pacific region have proven to be particularly difficult to resolve. Internal conflicts in Southeast Asia and the Pacific often concern territorial issue, for instance, East Timor and ethnically based conflicts in Myanmar. This is also true for conflicts in the South Pacific, notably in Bougainville (Papua New Guinea) and New Caledonia (France). Territorial conflicts last longer, are more difficult to manage, and generally produce more adverse consequences than those over other issues such as ideology, government, and national power. Further, conflicts in this region appear to be of low priority for third parties, with comparatively few interventions from third parties. The strong central governments seem to be a factor in preventing mediation-based solution to such conflicts. Nevertheless, there are reasons to be optimistic. Third party mediation, democratization, and the recent success in Aceh provide promise for the future, and the recent Nobel Prize confirms this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 7, no 2, 241-264 p.
Keyword [en]
Mediation, Democracy, Southeast Asia, South Pacific, Conflict Resolution, Armed Conflict
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-111204DOI: 10.1007/s10308-009-0229-zISI: 000266479500003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-111204DiVA: diva2:279783
Available from: 2009-12-07 Created: 2009-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Wallensteen, Peter

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