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The bold and the variable: Fish with high heterozygosity act recklessly in the vicinity of predators
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population and conservation biology.
2008 (English)In: Ethology, ISSN 0179-1613, E-ISSN 1439-0310, Vol. 114, no 1, 7-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Variation in the innate behavioral response to predation threat is often assumed to reflect genetic differences among the prey individuals. To date, no published results, however, exist that would offer explanation for the origin of this behavioral variation within populations. Using microsatellites as markers, we estimated the genetic variability of juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) individuals whose behavior had been individually recorded in a trade-off situation where both predator chemical cues and food were present. Mean overall heterozygosity and the internal relatedness of fish associated significantly with their activity and foraging, so that the genetically more variable individuals showed more risk-prone behavior under predation risk. No association between genetic variability and behavior was found in trials where predator odors were not present. These results were consistent over the three study populations of brown trout with different backgrounds, suggesting that the phenomenon is of general nature in this species. Of the possible mechanisms suggested to enable the existence of the positive association between neutral microsatellite variation and fitness-related trait, the local effect hypothesis gained more support from our data than the general effect hypothesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 114, no 1, 7-15 p.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-113026DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.2007.01449.xISI: 000252233100002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-113026DiVA: diva2:289821
Available from: 2010-01-25 Created: 2010-01-25 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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