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Ganglion Cell and 'Dendrite' Populations in Electric Acoustic Stimulation Ears
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
2010 (English)In: Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0065-3071, E-ISSN 1662-2847, Vol. 67, 14-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aims: The electric acoustic stimulation (EAS) technique combines electric and acoustic stimulation in the same ear and utilizes both low-frequency acoustic hearing and electric stimulation of preserved neurons. We present data of ganglion cell and dendrite populations in ears from normal individuals and those suffering from adult-onset hereditary progressive hearing loss with various degrees of residual low-frequency hearing. Some of these were potential candidates for EAS surgery. The data may give us information about the neuroanatomic situation in EAS ears. Methods: Dendrites and ganglion cells were calculated and audiocytocochleograms constructed. The temporal bones were from the collection at the House Ear Institute in Los Angeles, Calif., USA. Normal human anatomy, based on surgical specimens, is presented. Results: Inner and outer hair cells, supporting cells, ganglion cells and dendrites were preserved in the apical region. In the mid-frequency region, around 1 kHz, the organ of Corti with inner and outer hair cells was often conserved while in the lower basal turn, representing frequencies above 3 kHz, the organ of Corti was atrophic and replaced by thin cells. Despite loss of hair cells and lamina fibers ganglion cells were present even after 28 years of deafness. Conclusions: Conditions with profound sensorineural hearing loss and preserved low-frequency hearing may have several causes and the pathology may vary accordingly. In our patients with progressive adult-onset sensorineural hearing loss (amalgamated into 'presbyacusis'), neurons were conserved even after long duration of deafness. These spiral ganglion cells may be excellent targets for electric stimulationusing the EAS technique.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 67, 14-27 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-113207DOI: 10.1159/000262593PubMedID: 19955718OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-113207DiVA: diva2:290130
Available from: 2010-01-26 Created: 2010-01-26 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Rask-Andersen, HelgeLiu, Wei

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