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Dissemination of Escherichia coli with CTX-M type ESBL between humans and yellow-legged gulls in the south of France
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases. (Björn Olsen)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
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2009 (English)In: PloS one, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 4, no 6, e5958- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extended Spectrum beta-Lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacteriaceae started to appear in the 1980s, and have since emerged as some of the most significant hospital-acquired infections with Escherichia coli and Klebsiella being main players. More than 100 different ESBL types have been described, the most widespread being the CTX-M beta-lactamase enzymes (bla(CTX-M) genes). This study focuses on the zoonotic dissemination of ESBL bacteria, mainly CTX-M type, in the southern coastal region of France. We found that the level of general antibiotic resistance in single randomly selected E. coli isolates from wild Yellow-legged Gulls in France was high. Nearly half the isolates (47.1%) carried resistance to one or more antibiotics (in a panel of six antibiotics), and resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin and streptomycin was most widespread. In an ESBL selective screen, 9.4% of the gulls carried ESBL producing bacteria and notably, 6% of the gulls carried bacteria harboring CTX-M-1 group of ESBL enzymes, a recently introduced and yet the most common clinical CTX-M group in France. Multi locus sequence type and phylogenetic group designations were established for the ESBL isolates, revealing that birds and humans share E. coli populations. Several ESBL producing E. coli isolated from birds were identical to or clustered with isolates with human origin. Hence, wild birds pick up E. coli of human origin, and with human resistance traits, and may accordingly also act as an environmental reservoir and melting pot of bacterial resistance with a potential to re-infect human populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 4, no 6, e5958- p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-113815DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005958ISI: 000267079500008PubMedID: 19536298OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-113815DiVA: diva2:291965
Available from: 2010-02-04 Created: 2010-02-04 Last updated: 2011-05-04Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Antibiotic Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Wild Birds
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibiotic Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Wild Birds
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The presence and spread of clinically important antibiotic-resistant bacteria in reservoirs from natural environments are not well studied compared to the clinical environments. The overall aim of this project was to study the presence of clinically important antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a reservoir from natural environments. Wild birds were chosen not only as indicators of the level of antibiotic resistance in surrounding natural bacterial populations, but also since birds can act as vectors of several potential pathogens including enteropathogens and because they by migration have an ability to spread these pathogens across geographical regions.

The studies in this thesis showed that wild birds carry antibiotic-resistant enterobacteriaceae. The levels and spectrum of antibiotic resistance varies between different bird populations and geographical regions. In bird populations without interaction with human activities throughout the year, antibiotic resistance is lacking. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria could however probably be dispersed to remote regions by bird migration. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and especially CTX-M types are found in comparable high levels in gull populations considering the recent emergence of these resistance genes in clinical settings. The CTX-M types found in wild birds are the same types that are found in clinical settings and in food producing animals from the same regions. ESBL-producing E. coli isolated from Yellow-legged Gulls are genetically heterogenous, reflecting that these resistance genes are present across the full E. coli genetic diversity. In wild birds CTX-M are found both in E. coli strains with previously known “human signature” as well as “novel” strains. This indicates that these genes are indeed very mobile and rapidly dispersing both through horizontal gene transfer and through successful clones. The findings in this thesis indicate that bird colonies could act as melting pots and reservoirs for new resistance types and that wild birds could act as important indicators of the level of antibiotic resistance dispersal in natural environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2011. 61 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 641
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-145480 (URN)978-91-554-8000-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-03-25, Hjärnan, Hus 15, Länssjukhuset, Lasarettsvägen, Kalmar, 09:00 (Swedish)
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Available from: 2011-03-04 Created: 2011-02-09 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved

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Bonnedahl, JonasMelhus, Åsa

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