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Breast cancer in young women: poor survival despite intensive treatment
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
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2009 (English)In: PLoS one, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 4, no 11, e7695- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is uncommon in young women and correlates with a less favourable prognosis; still it is the most frequent cancer in women under 40, accounting for 30-40% of all incident female cancer. The aim of this study was to study prognosis in young women, quantifying how much stage at diagnosis and management on the one hand, and tumour biology on the other; each contribute to the worse prognosis seen in this age group. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a registry based cohort of women aged 20-69 (n = 22 017) with a primary diagnosis of invasive breast cancer (1992-2005), women aged 20-34 (n = 471), 35-39 (n = 858) and 40-49 (n = 4789) were compared with women aged 50-69 years (n = 15 899). The cumulative 5-year relative survival ratio and the relative excess mortality (RER) were calculated. The cumulative 5-year relative survival ratio was lowest in women aged 20-34. The RER was 2.84 for women aged 20-34 and decreased with increasing age (RER 1.76 and 1.17 for women aged 35-39 and 40-49, respectively). The excess risk was, however, present only in disease stages I and II. For women aged 20-34 with stage I disease RER was 4.63, and 6.70 in the subgroup with tumour size 1-10 mm. The absolute difference in stage I between the youngest and the reference groups amounted to nearly 8%, with a 90% 5-year survival in women aged 20-34. In stages IIa and IIb, the relative excess risk was not as dramatic, but the absolute differences approached 15%. The youngest women with small tumours generally received more aggressive treatment than women in older age groups. CONCLUSIONS: After correction for stage, tumour characteristics and treatment, age remained an independent risk factor for breast cancer death in women <35 years of age. The excess risk for young women was only seen in early stages of disease and was most pronounced in women with small tumours. Young women affected by breast cancer have a high risk of dying compared to their middle-aged counterparts even if diagnosed early and receiving an intense treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 4, no 11, e7695- p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-113867DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0007695PubMedID: 19907646OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-113867DiVA: diva2:292027
Available from: 2010-02-04 Created: 2010-02-04 Last updated: 2010-02-16Bibliographically approved

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