uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Geographical prevalence, risk factors and impact of hepatitis B and C after renal transplantation
Show others and affiliations
2009 (English)In: Clinical Nephrology, ISSN 0301-0430, Vol. 71, no 4, 423-429 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) virus infections are major risk factors affecting long-term morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. Hepatitis prevalence is subject to geographical variations. OBJECTIVE: To compare and analyze the geographical prevalence, risk factors and impact of HBV and HCV infection in multinational cohorts of renal transplant recipients. METHODS: From 1989 - 2002, data on 12,856 kidney transplant recipients in 37 countries were collected within the prospective MOST (Multinational Observational Study in Transplantation). Subgroup analyses of hepatitis-related prevalence, risk factors and impact were conducted on patients whose HBV and HCV status was available at time of transplantation. Countries were substratified according to population prevalence of > or = 5% HBV or > or = 10% HCV. RESULTS: The prevalence of HBV was 2.9%, of HCV 8.7% and of HBV together with HCV 0.4%. Risk factors for hepatitis infection in renal transplant recipients were long dialysis time, retransplantation and blood transfusions. At each study endpoint up to 5 years after transplantation, no significant differences in graft function were observed, although the 1-year acute rejection rate tended to be lower in HCV+ patients. At 5 years post-transplant, there were no differences between the subgroups and regions regarding infections, post-transplant diabetes mellitus or malignancies including PTLD. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, HCV infections are more prevalent than HBV. Despite large geographical differences in prevalence, HBV and HCV status did not appear to have a significant impact on renal graft function, infections, malignancies and post-transplant diabetes mellitus up to 5 years after renal transplantation throughout the MOST countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 71, no 4, 423-429 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-114149ISI: 000265097800008PubMedID: 19356375OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-114149DiVA: diva2:293229
Available from: 2010-02-11 Created: 2010-02-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

PubMed

Authority records BETA

Tufveson, Gunnar

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tufveson, Gunnar
By organisation
Transplantation Surgery
In the same journal
Clinical Nephrology
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 451 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf