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Sick building syndrome in relation to domestic exposure in Sweden: A cohort study from 1991 to 2001
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (eva vingård)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (eva vingård)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
2010 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 38, no 3, 232-238 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Most studies on sick building syndrome (SBS) are cross-sectional and have dealt with symptoms among office workers. There are very few longitudinal cohort studies and few studies on SBS in relation to domestic exposures. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in SBS symptoms during the follow-up period and also to investigate changes in different types of indoor exposures at home and relate them to SBS symptoms in a population sample of adults from Sweden. We also wanted to investigate if there was any seasonal or regional variation in associations between exposure and SBS. METHODS: A random sample of 1,000 people of the general population in Sweden (1991) was sent a self administered questionnaire. A follow-up questionnaire was sent in 2001. RESULTS: An increased risk for onset of any skin symptoms (risk ratio (RR) 2.32, 1.37-3.93), mucosal symptoms (RR 3.17, 1.69-5.95) or general symptoms (RR 2.18, 1.29-3.70) was found for those who had dampness or moulds in the dwelling during follow-up. In addition people living in damp dwellings had a lower remission of general symptoms and skin symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Dampness in the dwelling is a risk factor for new onset of SBS symptoms. Focus on indoor environment improvements in dwellings can be beneficial both for the inhabitants and the general population. Reducing dampness in buildings is an important factor for reducing SBS symptoms in the general population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 38, no 3, 232-238 p.
Keyword [en]
Asthma, building dampness, cohort study moulds, indoor environment, sick building syndrome (SBS) Introduction Sick
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122947DOI: 10.1177/1403494809350517ISI: 000277168800002PubMedID: 19850651OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-122947DiVA: diva2:311470
Available from: 2010-04-21 Created: 2010-04-21 Last updated: 2012-08-01Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Indoor Environment in Dwellings and Sick Building Syndrome (SBS): Longitudinal Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indoor Environment in Dwellings and Sick Building Syndrome (SBS): Longitudinal Studies
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

People spend most of their time indoors and mostly in the dwelling. It is therefore important to investigate associations between indoor exposure in dwellings and health. Symptoms that may be related to the indoor environment are sometimes referred to as the "sick building syndrome" (SBS). SBS involves symptoms such as eye, skin and upper airway irritation, headache and fatigue. Three longitudinal studies and one prevalence study on personal and environmental risk factors for SBS in adults were performed. The prevalence study included measurements of indoor exposures in the dwellings. The longitudinal studies, with 8-10 years follow-up time, showed that smoking and indoor paint emissions were risk factors for SBS. Moreover, building dampness and moulds in dwellings were risk factors for onset (incidence) of general symptoms, skin symptoms and mucosal symptoms. In addition subjects living in damp dwellings have a lower remission of general symptoms and skin symptoms. Hay fever was a risk factor for onset of skin symptoms and mucosal symptoms, and asthma was a risk factor for onset of general and mucosal symptoms. Biomarkers of allergy and inflammation (bronchial reactivity, total IgE, ECP and eosinophil count) were predictors of onset of SBS symptoms, in particular mucosal symptoms. In the prevalence study, any SBS-symptom was associated with some individual volatile organic compounds of possible microbial origin (MVOC) e.g. 2-pentanol, 2-hexanon, 2-pentylfuran and 1-octen-3ol. Moreover, there were associations between indoor levels of formaldehyde and the plasticizer Texanol and any SBS. The result from the study indicates that individual MVOC are better indicators of SBS than the total value of MVOC. A final conclusion is that smoking, dampness and moulds and emissions from indoor painting may increase the onset of SBS. The indoor environment in dwellings over time has improved, but there is still a need for further improvements of the indoor environment in dwellings. More longitudinal SBS studies are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2012. 63 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 783
Keyword
Indoor environment, sick building syndrome (SBS), dwelling, longitudinal cohort study, building dampness, mould, microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC), biomarkers, asthma, risk factors
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Research subject
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-172769 (URN)978-91-554-8393-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-06-13, Frödingsalen, Ulleråkersvägen 40, Uppsala, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-05-23 Created: 2012-04-13 Last updated: 2012-08-01Bibliographically approved

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