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Doing a good job and getting something good out of it: on stress and well-being in anaesthesia
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
2010 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 105, no 1, 34-37 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract: The anaesthetist's work, aimed at giving safe anaesthesia to patients, can do both harm and good to the anaesthetist. Research on stress in anaesthesia has traditionally focused on how the negative effects of stress can be avoided and much effort has been put into improving anaesthetists' work environment to reduce the level of stress. In this review, however, we give attention instead to what the individual anaesthetist can do to improve his or her well-being at work. Stress is, and will remain, an inevitable aspect of the anaesthetist's occupation but, as for any professional working in a stressful environment, adaptive coping can make a big difference in outcome. The choice between construing a difficult clinical situation as threat or challenge is important here because of the difference in the resulting stress response. The anaesthetist can reduce the stress effect of a potentially stressful situation by thinking of it in a new way, by redefining it through reappraisal. We describe here some lines of thought that experienced anaesthetists use to buffer the effects of work stress on physical health and mental well-being. By reframing a situation, they can reduce its stress content even if the problem at hand cannot be successfully solved. Trainee anaesthetists, who experience much stress at work and are at risk of burnout, would benefit from learning about these coping strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 105, no 1, 34-37 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-125629DOI: 10.1093/bja/aeq125ISI: 000278969500007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-125629DiVA: diva2:320412
Available from: 2010-05-25 Created: 2010-05-25 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, JanSanner, Margareta

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