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Direct observation of female mating frequency using time-lapse photography
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
2009 (English)In: Fly, ISSN 1933-6934, Vol. 3, no 2, 118-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One basic condition of postmating sexual selection is that females mate more than once before fertilizing their ova. Knowledge of the frequency and extent of multiple mating in a given population or species is therefore important in order to fully understand the potential for sexual selection, in the form of sperm competition, sexual conflict and cryptic female choice. Surprisingly, there are only a handful of studies that have attempted to estimate the frequency of multiple mating in insects (including Drosophila) and none have made direct observations over extended periods of time. Here we use time-lapse photography to directly score matings in isolated pairs of D. melanogaster and show that multiple mating in the laboratory occurs at a high frequency but at comparable rates with wild caught females. We also find that the interval to remating rises approximately additively with each mating, indicating either an increase in female resistance or male reluctance to remate. These results suggest that the opportunity for postmating sexual selection in laboratory and natural environments are not dramatically different and that there may be a causal link between the rise in female mating resistance and the concomitant rise in the cost of mating. The method is easily executed and could be adapted to other insect models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 3, no 2, 118-120 p.
Keyword [en]
mating rate, remating, sperm competition, cryptic female choice, sexual antagonism, sexual selection, Drosophila melanogaster
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-128383ISI: 000267818600002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-128383DiVA: diva2:331471
Available from: 2010-07-22 Created: 2010-07-20 Last updated: 2016-04-18Bibliographically approved

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