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Genomic evidence for a large-Z effect
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
2009 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 276, no 1655, 361-366 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The 'large-X effect' suggests that sex chromosomes play a disproportionate role in adaptive evolution. Theoretical work indicates that this effect may be most pronounced in genetic systems with female heterogamety under both good-genes and Fisher's runaway models of sexual selection (males ZZ, females ZW). Here, I use a comparative genomic approach (alignments of several thousands of chicken-zebra finch-human-mouse-opossum orthologues) to show that avian Z-linked genes are highly overrepresented among those bird-mammalian orthologues that show evidence of accelerated rate of functional evolution in birds relative to mammals; the data suggest a twofold excess of such genes on the Z chromosome. A reciprocal analysis of genes accelerated in mammals found no evidence for an excess of X-linkage. This would be compatible with theoretical expectations for differential selection on sex-linked genes under male and female heterogamety, although the power in this case was not sufficient to statistically show that 'large-Z' was more pronounced than 'large-X'. Accelerated Z-linked genes include a variety of functional categories and are characterized by higher non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios than both accelerated autosomal and non-accelerated genes. This points at a genomic 'large-Z effect', which is widespread and of general significance for adaptive divergence in birds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 276, no 1655, 361-366 p.
Keyword [en]
large-Z, adaptive evolution, sex chromosomes
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-129268DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.1135ISI: 000262005200022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-129268DiVA: diva2:338150
Available from: 2010-08-10 Created: 2010-08-10 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Ellegren, Hans

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