uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
STI-prevalence and differences in social background and sexual behavior among urban and rural young women in Uganda
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Internationell kvinno- & mödrahälsovård/Essén)
Dept of Obstetrices and Gynaecology, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Internationell kvinno- & mödrahälsovård/Essén)
2010 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 1, no 3, 111-115 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Adolescents in Uganda carry a heavy burden of reproductive health problems. Different environment creates different problems.

Objectives: To study the prevalence of STI and to compare social and behavioral risk factors for Neisseria gonorrhoea (NG) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) among sexually experienced young women in one urban and one rural area in Uganda.

Methods: Consenting, sexually experienced women, below 20 years, visiting two different youth clinics were asked about social background, genital symptoms and sexual experiences. Vaginal samples were taken for NG and CT and analyzed by PCR.

Results: The prevalence of NG and/or CT was 20 (6.8%) in the urban and 23 (7.8%) in the rural study site, a non-significant difference. The rural women were often in marital union, 25.3% compared to 12.2% of the urban women (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.6-3.8) and had experienced more pregnancies and had more children. Their partners were often more than 10 years older. More urban women (42.2%) knew their HIV status compared to rural women (16.2%), OR 2.1 (1.6–2.7), reported more condom use and more sexual partners.

Conclusions: Marital status and few sexual partners does not appear to protect young rural women from sexually transmitted infections (STIs), implying that male sexual behavior may have an important impact on women’s risk to be infected.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 1, no 3, 111-115 p.
Keyword [en]
Adolescents, Sexual behavior, Urban, Rural, STI, HIV
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-129822DOI: 10.1016/j.srhc.2010.03.001ISI: 000208559800007Scopus ID: 21122607OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-129822DiVA: diva2:345391
Available from: 2010-08-25 Created: 2010-08-25 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Darj, Elisabeth

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Darj, Elisabeth
By organisation
Department of Women's and Children's Health
In the same journal
Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 441 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf