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Competitive environments induce shifts in host fidelity
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
2010 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 23, no 8, 1657-1663 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent models support the idea of sympatric speciation as a result of the joint effects of disruptive selection and assortative mating. We present experimental data, testing models of speciation through frequency-dependent selection. We show that under high competition on a mixture of resources/hosts, strains of the Seed beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus, change their host fidelity and evolve a more generalistic behaviour in resource utilisation among females. The change in host fidelity did not result in disruptive selection and was not followed by assortative mating. This means that only one out of three fundamental prerequisites for sympatric speciation evolved as a result of the frequency-dependent selection. We conclude that for this process to work, a shift to a novel food resource as a result of selection must also lead to a loss of preference for the original source such that individuals are only able to use either one of the two.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 23, no 8, 1657-1663 p.
Keyword [en]
assortative mating, Callosobruchus maculatus, experimental evidence, frequency-dependent selection, host fidelity, resource preference, sympatric speciation
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-130110DOI: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.02031.xISI: 000279901400008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-130110DiVA: diva2:346455
Available from: 2010-09-01 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2016-04-18Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The role of Assortative Mating in the Initial Stages of Sympatric and Parapatric Speciation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of Assortative Mating in the Initial Stages of Sympatric and Parapatric Speciation
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Divergence in the face of gene flow is perhaps the most wildly disputed subject among researchers through time. The debate is an old one and we find its origin as far back as the era of Darwin. The theories dealing with sympatric and parapatric speciation, its processes and ecological conditions, are numerous and the empirical data supporting the ideas is constantly growing. However, the reach of a consensus almost seem as distant as ever. Two fundamental prerequisites can be identified for the evolution of divergence with gene flow, the act of disruptive selection, and the development of assortative mating. A set of models in which speciation with gene flow seem particularly likely is when a shift occurs in host preference in phytophagous insects and mating takes place on the host. In the work behind this thesis, the role of assortative mating in the initial stages of sympatric and parapatric speciation has been studied, as has the interaction between assortative mating and inbreeding and how it effects speciation in small sympatric populations, an aspect not much attended to earlier in the literature. My results show that assortative mating based on resource preference, can evolve rapidly upon secondary contact, and even in parapatric populations with a migration rate of 8% (13-15 individuals) per generation. However for assortative mating to be maintained selection against hybrids is needed. My results also suggests that small inbred populations have a hard time coping with strong assortative mating an as a consequence tend to relax their mating preferences to avoid inbreeding depression. Based on these results, I advocate for the importance of considering not only assortative mating in itself, but also the joint effects of assortative mating and inbreeding when dealing with theories of speciation with gene flow.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2010. 34 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 765
Keyword
Callosobruchus maculatus, host fidelity, assortative mating, inbreeding, experimental evidence, sympatric speciation, parapatric speciation
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-130764 (URN)978-91-554-7889-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-10-15, Zootissalen, EBC, Norbyv. 18, Uppsala, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-09-23 Created: 2010-09-13 Last updated: 2016-04-22Bibliographically approved

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Rova, EmmaBjörklund, Mats

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