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Assortative mating and the cost of inbreeding: A simulation approach
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
2012 (English)In: Ecological Informatics, ISSN 1574-9541, E-ISSN 1878-0512, Vol. 9, 59-63 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Assortative mating is an important factor in the process of speciation. Models of speciation frequently deal with small founder populations often with mating preferences based on ecological traits or habitat preferences. Small populations, on the other hand might suffer from inbreeding. However, few studies have explored the combined effects of assortative mating and inbreeding in such populations. Can they speciate, or are they doomed to eventually go extinct? With this simulation we show that assortative mating based on similarities increases the possibility for change in a population, as long as the population does not suffer from inbreeding depression. Inbred populations seem not to be able to cope with strong assortative mating, as this is likely to elevate the level of inbreeding, increasing the risks of inbreeding depression and as a result decreasing population mean fitness. This in turn hinders the possibility of change, and instead might drive the population to extinction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 9, 59-63 p.
Keyword [en]
Assortative mating, Inbreeding, Inbreeding avoidance, Simulation
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-130114DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoinf.2012.03.005ISI: 000304636800006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-130114DiVA: diva2:346463
Available from: 2010-09-01 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The role of Assortative Mating in the Initial Stages of Sympatric and Parapatric Speciation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of Assortative Mating in the Initial Stages of Sympatric and Parapatric Speciation
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Divergence in the face of gene flow is perhaps the most wildly disputed subject among researchers through time. The debate is an old one and we find its origin as far back as the era of Darwin. The theories dealing with sympatric and parapatric speciation, its processes and ecological conditions, are numerous and the empirical data supporting the ideas is constantly growing. However, the reach of a consensus almost seem as distant as ever. Two fundamental prerequisites can be identified for the evolution of divergence with gene flow, the act of disruptive selection, and the development of assortative mating. A set of models in which speciation with gene flow seem particularly likely is when a shift occurs in host preference in phytophagous insects and mating takes place on the host. In the work behind this thesis, the role of assortative mating in the initial stages of sympatric and parapatric speciation has been studied, as has the interaction between assortative mating and inbreeding and how it effects speciation in small sympatric populations, an aspect not much attended to earlier in the literature. My results show that assortative mating based on resource preference, can evolve rapidly upon secondary contact, and even in parapatric populations with a migration rate of 8% (13-15 individuals) per generation. However for assortative mating to be maintained selection against hybrids is needed. My results also suggests that small inbred populations have a hard time coping with strong assortative mating an as a consequence tend to relax their mating preferences to avoid inbreeding depression. Based on these results, I advocate for the importance of considering not only assortative mating in itself, but also the joint effects of assortative mating and inbreeding when dealing with theories of speciation with gene flow.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2010. 34 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 765
Keyword
Callosobruchus maculatus, host fidelity, assortative mating, inbreeding, experimental evidence, sympatric speciation, parapatric speciation
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-130764 (URN)978-91-554-7889-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-10-15, Zootissalen, EBC, Norbyv. 18, Uppsala, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-09-23 Created: 2010-09-13 Last updated: 2016-04-22Bibliographically approved

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Mats, BjörklundEmma, Rova

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