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Foodwork among people with intellectual disabilities and dietary implications depending on staff involvement
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3882-2785
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN ISSN 1501-7419, EISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 14, no 1, 40-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The food provision for people with intellectual disability (ID) in Sweden is organized within their own households. The aim of this study was to describe how foodwork – planning for meals, shopping for food and cooking – is performed in different social contexts in community settings involving people with ID, staff or both. Dietary intake in the main meals in relation to foodwork practice was also studied. Four different foodwork practices could be distinguished. For some participants only one kind of foodwork practice was found, but for most of them two or more different practices. There was a tendency that food items and dishes chosen and used differed depending on what foodwork practice was performed, which, in turn, affected the nutrient intake. More attention needs to be directed to these everyday matters as a means to increase the quality of support in food for people with ID.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis , 2012. Vol. 14, no 1, 40-55 p.
Keyword [en]
community housing, foodwork, intellectuel disability, dietary intake
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-131325DOI: 10.1080/15017419.2010.507384OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-131325DiVA: diva2:354089
Available from: 2010-09-29 Created: 2010-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-12
In thesis
1. Food Related Activities and Food Intake in Everyday Life among People with Intellectual Disabilities
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food Related Activities and Food Intake in Everyday Life among People with Intellectual Disabilities
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this thesis was to study food, eating and meals in the everyday life of 32 women and men with intellectual disabilities (IDs) who require varying levels of supervision. They lived in supported living (rather independently) or group homes in community-based home-like settings. Observations during 3 days, assisted food records and anthropometric measurements were used to collect data. Dietary intake on the group level showed a varied diet and sufficient intake of all micronutrients, but a low dietary fibre intake. On the individual level, inadequate intake of micronutrients was observed, with many participants being obese, overweight or underweight. Everyday support with food, eating and meals was seen in four praxis: foodwork by oneself for oneself, foodwork in co-operation, foodwork disciplined by staff and foodwork by staff. These four practices resulted in large variations in dietary intake. The first praxis entailed more convenience food and less vitamins, the second and third, more fresh ingredients and high energy intake, and the fourth, low energy intake but rather high intake of vitamins. Sharing of meals was least common in supported living and more common in group homes and daily activity centres. The participants’ social eating spheres consisted mostly of other people with ID and staff members, and seldom other people. Whereas some preferred solitary eating, many participants considered eating together as important, but required staff support in establishing commensality. However, disturbing behaviour, as determined by the staff, could result in solitary eating. In conclusion, supporting the group rather than the individual sometimes created less favourable dietary, eating and meal outcomes. This problem needs to be addressed in order to establish food security at the individual level. In addition, actions should be taken to ensure that people with intellectual disabilities receive sufficient support to meet their individual needs and aspirations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis., 2010. 65 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 64
Keyword
Nutrition, Intellectual disability, food security, community living
Research subject
Nutrition; Domestic Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-131328 (URN)978-91-554-7904-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-11-12, C8:305, BMC, Husargatan 3, Uppsala, 09:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-10-22 Created: 2010-09-29 Last updated: 2011-01-13Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/15017419.2010.507384

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Adolfsson, PäiviFjellström, ChristninaMattsson Sydner, Ylva

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