uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Real-Space Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Attachment of Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles to DNA-Coils Acting as a Biosensor
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Experimental Physics. (Electron Microscopy and Nanoengineering)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 114, no 41, 13255-13262 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present work provides the first real-space analysis of nanobead-DNA coil interactions. Immobilization of oligonucleotide-functionalized magnetic nanobeads in rolling circle amplified DNA-coils was studied by complex magnetization measurements and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and a statistical analysis of the number of beads hybridized to the DNA-coils was performed. The average number of beads per DNAcoil using the results from both methods was found to be around 6 and slightly above 2 for samples with 40 and 130 nm beads, respectively. The TEM analysis supported an earlier hypothesis that 40 nm beads are preferably immobilized in the interior of DNA-coils whereas 130 nm beads, to a larger extent, are immobilized closer to the exterior of the coils. The methodology demonstrated in the present work should open up new possibilities for characterization of interactions of a large variety of functionalized nanoparticles with macromolecules, useful for gaining more fundamental understanding of such interactions as well as for optimizing a number of biosensor applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 114, no 41, 13255-13262 p.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-132261DOI: 10.1021/jp105756bISI: 000282855100028OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-132261DiVA: diva2:357344
Available from: 2010-10-18 Created: 2010-10-18 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Graphene and Hydrated Biomaterial Nanostructures: Novel Techniques and Analysis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transmission Electron Microscopy of Graphene and Hydrated Biomaterial Nanostructures: Novel Techniques and Analysis
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) on light element materials and soft matters is problematic due to electron irradiation damage and low contrast. In this doctoral thesis techniques were developed to address some of those issues and successfully characterize these materials at high resolution. These techniques were demonstrated on graphene flakes, DNA/magnetic beads and a number of water containing biomaterials. The details of these studies are given below.

A TEM based method was presented for thickness characterization of graphene flakes. For the thickness characterization, the dynamical theory of electron diffraction is used to obtain an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam as a function of thickness. From JEMS simulations (experiments) the absorption constant λ in a low symmetry orientation was found to be ~ 208 nm (225 ± 9 nm). When compared to standard techniques for thickness determination of graphene/graphite, the method has the advantage of being relatively simple, fast and requiring only the acquisition of bright-field (BF) images. Using the proposed method, it is possible to measure the thickness change due to one monolayer of graphene if the flake has uniform thickness over a larger area.

A real-space TEM study on magnetic bead-DNA coil interaction was conducted and a statistical analysis of the number of beads attached to the DNA-coils was performed. The average number of beads per DNA coil was calculated around 6 and slightly above 2 for samples with 40 nm and 130 nm beads, respectively. These results are in good agreement with magnetic measurements. In addition, the TEM analysis supported an earlier hypothesis that 40 nm beads are preferably attached interior of the DNA-coils while 130 nm beads closer to the exterior of the coils.

A focused ion-beam in-situ lift-out technique for hydrated biological specimens was developed for cryo-TEM. The technique was demonstrated on frozen Aspergillus niger spores which were frozen with liquid nitrogen to preserve their cellular structures. A thin lamella was prepared, lifted out and welded to a TEM grid. Once the lamella was thinned to electron transparency, the grid was cryogenically transferred to the TEM using a cryo-transfer bath. The structure of the cells was revealed by BF imaging. Also, a series of energy filtered images was acquired and C, N and Mn elemental maps were produced. Furthermore, 3 Å lattice fringes of the underlying Al support were successfully resolved by high resolution imaging, confirming that the technique has the potential to extract structural information down to the atomic scale. The experimental protocol is ready now to be employed on a large variety of samples e.g. soft/hard matter interfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2012. 124 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 917
Keyword
Graphene flakes, magnetic beads/DNA coils, hydrated biomaterials, transmission electron microscopy, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, bright-field/dark-field imaging, high resolution imaging, electron diffraction and cryogenic temperatures
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Materials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171991 (URN)978-91-554-8333-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-05-21, Häggsalen, Ångströmlaboratoriet, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, Uppsala, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-04-26 Created: 2012-03-30 Last updated: 2012-08-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Akhtar, SultanStrömberg, MattiasZardán Gómez de la Torre, TeresaRussell, CamillaGunnarsson, KlasNilsson, MatsSvedlindh, PeterStrömme, MariaLeifer, Klaus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Akhtar, SultanStrömberg, MattiasZardán Gómez de la Torre, TeresaRussell, CamillaGunnarsson, KlasNilsson, MatsSvedlindh, PeterStrömme, MariaLeifer, Klaus
By organisation
Experimental PhysicsNanotechnology and Functional MaterialsDepartment of Genetics and PathologySolid State Physics
In the same journal
Journal of Physical Chemistry B
Engineering and Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 1277 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf