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Self-rated health, life-style, and psychoendocrine measures of stress in healthy adult women
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
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2010 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 115, no 4, 266-274 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Self-rated health (SRH) is a robust predictor of subsequent health outcome, independent of objective health measures and life-style-related health risk factors. However, the determinants of SRH are as yet largely unknown. In accordance with the prevailing stress theory, we hypothesized that SRH is associated with personal coping resources, psychological strain, life-style variables, and endocrine variables.

Methods. A total of 106 healthy women, 22-59 years of age, were followed for up to 3 years with annual blood sampling (cortisol, prolactin, testosterone) and written questionnaires in which information on SRH, psychological strain, coping resources, socio-economic and life-style variables was sought.

Results. In bivariate, screening logistic regression analyses, intended to find candidate variables for a final analysis model, all coping resource variables (sense of coherence, mastery, and self-esteem) were significantly related to SRH, and so were two psychological strain variables (vital exhaustion, and sleep disturbances), one life-style variable (fitness), but none of the endocrine variables. In the final multivariate analysis model, including all candidate variables, only vital exhaustion (P < 0.0001), fitness (P = 0.0002), and sense of coherence (P = 0.0006) were independently associated with SRH, together explaining 74% of the SRH variance.

Conclusion. Some elements of the hypothesis, i.e. the effects of coping resources, psychological strain, and life-style variables on SRH, were supported by the results, while others, i.e. effects of endocrine measures on SRH, were not, indicating a possible gender difference.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare , 2010. Vol. 115, no 4, 266-274 p.
Keyword [en]
Cortisol, prolactin, self-rated health, sense of coherence, testosterone, vital exhaustion
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-132358DOI: 10.3109/03009734.2010.496910ISI: 000283555900008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-132358DiVA: diva2:358988
Available from: 2010-10-26 Created: 2010-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Self-rated Health with special reference to Prevalence, Determinants and Consequences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated Health with special reference to Prevalence, Determinants and Consequences
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The overall aim was to investigate determinants and consequences of global non-comparative self-ratings of health (SRH). Concerning determinants, the aim was more specifically to investigate the association between age, year of investigation, stress-theory based psychobiological variables, and SRH.

Materials and methods: Papers I and IV were based on eight ongoing population-based cohort studies, with sampling performed 1973-2003. The study-population consisted of 11,880 men and women, aged 25-99 years, providing 14,470 observations. Papers II and III were based on a longitudinal study of 212 adult, healthy, women and men.

Results: In women, SRH declined linearly with age and year of investigation, after adjustment for influence of covariates, while in men the association was based on a third degree polynomial function. The most important covariates were complaint score, sick-leave or disability pension, and leisure time physical activity. The final model explained 76.2% of the variance in women and 74.5% in men. SRH was directly associated with psychological resources and inversely associated with psychological strain, in healthy, adult, women and men. In men with SRH which decreased to fair or poor, higher levels of prolactin and lower levels of testosterone were observed at follow-up as compared to baseline. There were no associations between endocrine variables and SRH in women. There was a significant inverse association between SRH and mortality, disability pension, and sick-leave during follow-up, in women and men, adjusted for covariates. Associations between SRH and mortality were robust during the follow-up period.

Conclusions: Age and year of investigation were associated with SRH, but differently in women and men. Psychological resources and psychological strain were consistently associated with SRH, but there were no robust associations between endocrine measures and SRH. SRH was associated with mortality, disability pension, and sick-leave, during follow-up. The association between SRH and mortality was robust during the follow-up period

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2010. 73 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 612
Keyword
Self-rated health, determinants, consequences
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-132363 (URN)978-91-554-7925-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-12-07, Rudbecksalen, Rudbecklaboratoriet, Dag Hammarskjölds väg 20, Uppsala, 13:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-11-16 Created: 2010-10-19 Last updated: 2011-05-13Bibliographically approved

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Halford, ChristinaEkselius, LisaAnderzén, IngridArnetz, BengtSvärdsudd, Kurt

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