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Working with families of persons with aphasia: a survey of Swedish speech and language pathologists
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
2011 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 1, 51-62 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose:The overall aim was to investigate how speech and language pathologists (SLPs), in Sweden are working with people with aphasia and their families and what their professional experiences are.

Method:A cross-sectional study with a descriptive and comparative design. An 84-item study-specific questionnaire was sent to all Swedish SLPs, affiliated to SLOF (the Swedish professional association and trade union).

Results:The response rate was 72.5% (n = 758). Thirty per cent worked with people with aphasia and typically met with their families. The participants considered the involvement of families as very important, especially concerning providing information of aphasia and training of communication strategies. However, involvement of families was limited due to a shortage of time, but also to perceived limited skill and knowledge.

Conclusions:There was an evident discrepancy between what the participants claimed to be an important part of their work, and their actual practice. It is suggested that to facilitate family intervention, this should be explicitly expressed in both local and national guidelines. The content of the SLP education, and the need of further education and implementation of new knowledge into clinical practice also requires consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 33, no 1, 51-62 p.
Keyword [en]
Aphasia services, speech-language pathology, family
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-134771DOI: 10.3109/09638288.2010.486465ISI: 000284695100006PubMedID: 20455706OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-134771DiVA: diva2:373664
Available from: 2010-12-01 Created: 2010-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Aphasia and Communication in Everyday Life: Experiences of persons with aphasia, significant others, and speech-language pathologists
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aphasia and Communication in Everyday Life: Experiences of persons with aphasia, significant others, and speech-language pathologists
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aims of this thesis were to describe the experiences of persons with aphasia and their significant others of their conversations and use of communication strategies, examine current practice of family-oriented speech-language pathology (SLP) services, and test a family-oriented intervention in the early phase of rehabilitation.

The persons with aphasia valued having conversations despite perceiving their aphasia as a serious social disability. They acknowledged the importance of the communication partners’ knowledge and understanding of aphasia and their use of supporting conversation strategies. Their own use of communication strategies varied considerably. The persons with aphasia longed to regain language ability and to be active participants in society.

A majority of the significant others perceived their conversations with the person with aphasia as being less stimulating and enjoyable than conversations before stroke onset. Aphasia was considered a serious problem. The significant others took on increased communicative responsibility, where two thirds had changed their communicative behaviour to facilitate conversations. Type and severity of aphasia were especially related to the communicative experiences of the significant others and their motivation to be involved in SLP services.

Thirty percent of the speech-language pathologists worked with people with aphasia and typically met with their families. They considered the involvement of significant others in SLP services as very important, especially in providing information about aphasia and communication partner training (CPT). However, involvement of significant others was restricted because of a time shortage and perceived limited skills and knowledge. In addition, there were national differences regarding aphasia rehabilitation services.

The intervention consisted of three sessions directed to significant others (primarily emotional support and information) and three directed to the dyads (a person with aphasia and a significant other) (primarily CPT). All six participants (three dyads) felt that their knowledge and understanding of aphasia had increased and that their conversations had improved. These improvements were also evident to some extent with formal assessments.

These results suggest the following: CPT should be an integral part of SLP services, national clinical guidelines are needed, and further education of speech-language pathologists and implementation of new knowledge into clinical practice requires consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2012. 101 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 776
Keyword
Aphasia, Significant others, Interpersonal communication, Communication strategies, Communication partner training, Speech-language pathology services
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-173130 (URN)978-91-554-8372-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-06-08, Gustavianum, Akademigatan 3, Uppsala, 09:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-05-16 Created: 2012-04-19 Last updated: 2012-08-01Bibliographically approved

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Blom Johansson, MonicaCarlsson, MarianneSonnander, Karin

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