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A conserved pattern of brain scaling from sharks to primates
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
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2010 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 107, no 29, 12946-12951 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several patterns of brain allometry previously observed in mammals have been found to hold for sharks and related taxa (chondrichthyans) as well. In each clade, the relative size of brain parts, with the notable exception of the olfactory bulbs, is highly predictable from the total brain size. Compared with total brain mass, each part scales with a characteristic slope, which is highest for the telencephalon and cerebellum. In addition, cerebellar foliation reflects both absolute and relative cerebellar size, in a manner analogous to mammalian cortical gyrification. This conserved pattern of brain scaling suggests that the fundamental brain plan that evolved in early vertebrates permits appropriate scaling in response to a range of factors, including phylogeny and ecology, where neural mass may be added and subtracted without compromising basic function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 107, no 29, 12946-12951 p.
Keyword [en]
chondrichthyan, cerebellar foliation, allometry, mammal, neuroevolution
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-135618DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1002195107ISI: 000280144500045PubMedID: 20616012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-135618DiVA: diva2:375342
Available from: 2010-12-08 Created: 2010-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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