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A further investigation of the importance of pain cognition and behaviour in pain rehabilitation: longitudinal data suggest disability and fear of movement are most important
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy.
2010 (English)In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 24, no 5, 422-430 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

 Tailored treatments are topical in pain rehabilitation. One key issue for correlational studies is the identification of factors having a potential causal impact on essential treatment outcomes.

Objective

 To study associations between pain beliefs and disability with regard to the amount and time-frame of available data.

Design

 A prospective, correlational design.

Subjects and setting

 Ninety-two patients consulting physical therapists in primary care for persistent musculoskeletal pain.

Main measures

 The Pain Disability Index, the Self-Efficacy Scale and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia.

Results

 Functional self-efficacy and fear of movement/(re) injury explained variance in pain-related disability pretreatment (adj R-2 = 0.41). Self-efficacy was the most salient predictor. Adding data from immediately post treatment decreased explained variance (adj R-2 = 0.25). Functional self-efficacy and fear of movement/ (re)injury lost their significant contribution in favour of pain-related disability at baseline. Change scores in functional self-efficacy and fear of movement/(re) injury accounted for a modest share of explained variance in change scores of disability (adj R-2 = 0.11). Fear of movement/(re) injury but not functional self-efficacy was related to a reliable change in pain-related disability.

 Conclusions

 Longitudinal data suggest that pretreatment levels of pain-related disability and changes in fear of movement/(re) injury are most important to immediate treatment outcomes and individual reliable change. Disability and elevated fear of movement/(re) injury should therefore be addressed in tailored pain treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 24, no 5, 422-430 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-136315DOI: 10.1177/0269215509353264ISI: 000277279300004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-136315DiVA: diva2:377058
Available from: 2010-12-13 Created: 2010-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Åsenlöf, Pernilla

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