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Diabetes aggravates heat stress-induced blood-brain barrier breakdown, reduction in cerebral blood flow, edema formation, and brain pathology: Possible neuroprotection with growth hormone
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
2010 (English)In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1199, 15-26 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The possibility that diabetes influences the outcome of heat stress-induced brain pathology was examined in our experimental rat model. Because growth hormone (GH) deficiency is an important factor in diabetes, the possible neuroprotective role of GH supplements was also examined in diabetic rats following heat stress. Rats receiving streptozotocine once daily for three days (50 mg/kg, i.p.) and allowed to survive four weeks resulted in diabetes (blood glucose level 18 and 20 mMol/L) compared to controls (blood glucose 4-6 mMol/L). Control or diabetic rats when subjected to four hours' heat stress at 38 degrees C in a biological oxygen demand incubator (BOD) showed profound disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), brain edema formation, and cell injury. These effects were most pronounced in diabetic rats. Pretreatment with GH (50 mu g/kg/min for 10 min before heat stress) significantly attenuated brain pathology in normal animals subjected to hyperthermia. On the other hand, almost a double dose of the growth hormone (80 to 120 mu g/g/min for 10 min) is needed in diabetic rats to induce considerable neuroprotection following heat stress. These observations are the first to suggest that diabetic rats are more vulnerable to heat stress-induced brain pathology and further show that the efficacy of neuroprotective drugs is also severely reduced in diabetic rats. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the dosage of neuroprotective drugs requires adjustment to enhance neuroprotection depending on the patient's endocrine or metabolic status, for example, diabetes mellitus, a finding not reported earlier.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 1199, 15-26 p.
Keyword [en]
heat stress, diabetes mellitus, neuropathology, hyperthermia, blood-brain barrier, cerebral blood flow, brain edema, hippocampus, growth hormone, neuroprotection
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-136480DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.05328.xISI: 000282838900002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-136480DiVA: diva2:377564
Available from: 2010-12-14 Created: 2010-12-13 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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