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Distributive Justice and the Durability of Negotiated Agreements
Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. Uppsala University. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
Responsible organisation
2008 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study explores the relationship between principles of justice and the durability of negotiated agreements. Focusing primarily on peace agreements negotiated during the early 1990s, the study provides evidence for a relationship.

Sixteen peace agreements were coded for the centrality of each of four principles of distributive justice – equality, proportionality, compensation, and need. The agreements were also judged on scales of durability and implementation over a five-year post-settlement period. Two other variables included in the analysis were the difficulty of the conflict environment and the willingness of international actors to be involved in the conflict. A modest correlation between justice and durability raised questions about the relationship. Further analyses showed that this correlation was accounted for by three anomalous cases, Rwanda, Somalia, and El Salvador.

A closer look at these cases led to a refinement of the coding decisions. The re-calculated correlations showed a stronger relationship between justice and durability, even when the effects of difficulty were controlled. Further support for a relationship was obtained from a focused comparison of selected cases matched on difficulty (Bosnia and Cambodia [high difficulty]; Guatemala and El Salvador [low difficulty]). The results suggest that when many principles of justice are included in an agreement, the negative effects of difficult conflict environments are reduced. When only a few principles are included, the negative effects of difficulty are heightened. Implications of these findings are discussed along with a number of ideas for further research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brisbane, Australia: Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (APACS) , 2008. , 39 p.
Series
Occasional Paper Series , No. 10
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11197OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-11197DiVA: diva2:38965
Projects
Making Negotiated Agreements Durable: The Role of Justice
Note
First report on results of research project, "Making Agreements Durable: The Role of Justice". Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University and the Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Queensland, Australia.Available from: 2008-01-29 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2009-03-05Bibliographically approved

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Albin, Cecilia

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
  • ieee
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