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Overweight more prevalent among children than among adolescents
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Pediatrik)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Tuvemo)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Tuvemo)
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2007 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 4, 577-581 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

To study if there is a change in paediatric overweight/obesity prevalence from 1982 to 2002 in a population with a high proportion of post-graduate education.

Design

Two samples of children in Uppsala County, Sweden, were compared: children who were 4, 10 and 16 year old in 1982; or 4, 10 and 16 year old in 2002. Mean BMI (in the lowest 10%, middle 50% and highest 10%) and ISO-BMI ('age adjusted BMI') cut-off values were calculated in each age and gender group.

Results

Using the mean BMI or ISO-BMI cut-off values, the BMI-distribution shifted from 1982 to 2002. More 4- and 10-year-old girls and boys were overweight/obese, although this shift was larger in girls. No shift was seen in the 16-year-olds, only the middle 50% group in the 16-year-old girls had a slight increase of their mean BMI. In the 2002 4-year-old, and both 10-year-old samples, a higher proportion of the girls were overweight/obese compared to the boys, but no difference was seen in the 16-year-old sample.

Conclusion

Young children, especially girls, have become much more overweight/obese during the past 20 years, despite a high proportion of post-graduate education in the population. The lack of major change in 16-year-olds may suggest a rather recent change in the children's environment/lifestyle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2007. Vol. 96, no 4, 577-581 p.
Keyword [en]
Body mass index, Epidemiology, Gender, Trends
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11330DOI: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2006.00189.xISI: 000245118500023PubMedID: 17391474OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-11330DiVA: diva2:39098
Available from: 2007-09-13 Created: 2007-09-13 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Holmbäck, UlfGustafsson, JanProos, LemmSundelin, Claes

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Clinical Nutrition and MetabolismDepartment of Women's and Children's Health
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