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Pet keeping and dampness in the dwelling: associations with airway infections, symptoms, and physiological signs from the ocular and nasal mucosa
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (Eva Vingård)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
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2007 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 17, no 1, 60-69 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to utilize data from a study of occupational indoor environments to analyze symptoms and physiological signs in relation to the home environment. A medical investigation was performed at the workplace among university staff (n = 173) from four university buildings in Bergen, in March 2004. Tear film break up time (BUT) was measured by two methods. Nasal patency was measured by acoustic rhinometry. Nasal lavage fluid analysis (NAL) included eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP); myeloperoxidase (MPO), lysozyme and albumin. Atopy was assessed by total serum IgE and specific IgE (Phadiatop®). Totally 21%, 21%, 18%, 11%, and 27% had weekly ocular, nasal, facial dermal symptoms, headache and tiredness, respectively, 15% had a damp dwelling, and 20% had a cat or dog. Multiple linear or logistic regressions were applied, controlling for age gender, smoking, and environmental factors. Building dampness was associated with increased NAL-lysozyme (P = 0.02) and an increase of airway infections [odd ratio (OR) = 3.14, P = 0.04]. Pet keeping was associated with difficulties to concentrate (OR = 5.10, P = 0.001), heavy headedness (OR = 4.35, P = 0.004), four more days with tiredness per month (P = 0.04), and less airway infections (OR = 0.32; P = 0.02). In conclusion, pet keeping was associated with more central nervous system (CNS)-symptoms but less airway infections. Dampness in the dwelling may have inflammatory effects on the airway mucosa, possibly mediated via increased infection proneness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 17, no 1, 60-69 p.
Keyword [en]
Building dampness, lysozyme, pet keeping, sick building syndrome, respiratory infection
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11655DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0668.2006.00455.xISI: 000243791600006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-11655DiVA: diva2:39424
Available from: 2007-10-10 Created: 2007-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Norbäck, DanWieslander, Gunilla

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