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Postoperative monitoring of lower limb free flaps with the Cook-Swartz implantable Doppler probe: A clinical trial
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
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2010 (English)In: Microsurgery, ISSN 0738-1085, E-ISSN 1098-2752, Vol. 30, no 5, 354-360 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Free flaps to the lower limb have inherently high venous pressures, potentially impairing flap viability, which may lead to limb amputation if flap failure ensues. Adequate monitoring of flap perfusion is thus essential, with timely detection of flap compromise able to potentiate flap salvage. While clinical monitoring has been popularized, recent use of the implantable Doppler probe has been used with success in other free flap settings. Methods: A comparative study of 40 consecutive patients undergoing microvascular free flap reconstruction of lower limb defects was undertaken, with postoperative monitoring achieved with either clinical monitoring alone or the use of the Cook-Swartz implantable Doppler probe. Results: The use of the implantable Doppler probe was associated with salvage of 2/2 compromised flaps compared to salvage of 2/5 compromised flaps in the group undergoing clinical monitoring alone (salvage rate 100% vs. 40%, P = 0.28). While not statistically significant, this was a strong trend toward an improved flap salvage rate with the use of the implantable Doppler probe. There were no false positives or negatives in either group. One flap loss in the clinically monitored group resulted in limb amputation (the only amputation in the cohort). Conclusion: A trend toward early detection and salvage of flaps with anastomotic insufficiency was seen with the use of the Cook-Swartz implantable Doppler probe. These findings suggest a possible benefit of this technique as a stand-alone or adjunctive tool in the clinical monitoring of free flaps, with further investigation warranted into the broader application of these devices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 30, no 5, 354-360 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-147279DOI: 10.1002/micr.20720ISI: 000280085900003PubMedID: 19967762OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-147279DiVA: diva2:400107
Available from: 2011-02-24 Created: 2011-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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