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Cerebral glucose metabolism after traumatic brain injury in the rat studied by C-13-glucose and microdialysis
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Gustafsson)
2011 (English)In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 153, no 3, p. 653-658Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), a disturbed cerebral glucose metabolism contributes to secondary brain damage. To study local cerebral glucose metabolism after TBI, we delivered C-13-labeled glucose into brain tissue by microdialysis (MD). MD probes were inserted bilaterally into the parietal cortex of rat brain, one probe in the shear stress zone of the injury and the other at the corresponding contralateral coordinates. A moderately severe controlled cortical contusion was used to model TBI. Dialysate concentrations of glucose, pyruvate, lactate, and glycerol were measured, and following derivatization, C-13 enrichments of the compounds were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that C-13-labeled glucose was rapidly converted into C-13-lactate and C-13-glycerol. In the hours following TBI, concentrations and C-13 enrichments of lactate and glycerol increased. The findings confirm the occurrence of anaerobic local glucose metabolism early after TBI. Only a small fraction of the glycerol was newly synthesized, suggesting that the hypothesis that most of the released glycerol after TBI comes from degradation of membrane phospholipids still holds. We conclude that the combination of microdialysis and stable isotope technique is a useful tool for investigating local glucose metabolism following brain injury.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 153, no 3, p. 653-658
Keywords [en]
Microdialysis, Traumatic brain injury, Metabolism, In vivo studies
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-148671DOI: 10.1007/s00701-010-0871-7ISI: 000287497500033PubMedID: 21103896OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-148671DiVA, id: diva2:402620
Available from: 2011-03-09 Created: 2011-03-09 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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