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The expanding brachiopod stem-group – First record of Mickwitzia from the Early Cambrian of South Australia
Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
2007 (English)In: 51st Palaeontological Association Annual Meeting: Programme with Abstracts, 2007, 37- p.Conference paper, Published paper (Other scientific)
Abstract [en]

New findings of Mickwitzia in the Flinders Ranges of South Australia represent the first record of this important genus in eastern Gondwana and show that it had a nearly global distribution in the Early Cambrian. The new fossils come from the late Early Cambrian Ajax Limestone (Pararaia tatei trilobite biozone – late Atdabanian-Botoman equivalent) of Mount Scott in the Flinders Ranges, South Australia. The new Australian Mickwitzia show distinct similarities with the roughly coeval material from Canada, including evidence for a possible pedicle foramen. Mickwitzia is regarded to be a derived member of the brachiopod stem group and combine important traits of crown group brachiopods with characters that are otherwise found among the problematic, tommotiids (sensu lato), particularly Micrina. Most importantly the shells of Micrina and Mickwitzia are provided with penetrative setal canals that have been recorded in all available material of mickwitziids, including the new Australian material. Recent studies have showed that shell penetrative setae are more widely distributed among brachiopods than previously thought, and even are retained in some rhynchonelliform lineages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. 37- p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-12602OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-12602DiVA: diva2:40371
Available from: 2008-01-08 Created: 2008-01-08

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Holmer, LarsSkovsted, Christian

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