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On adhesion in tribological contacts-Causes and consequences
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
2007 (English)In: Tribologia, ISSN 0780-2285, Vol. 26, no 1, 3-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is focused to the metallurgical consequences of severe adhesive wear of metallicmaterials. Early examples from the late 70:ies from sliding wear tests of different steels areshown together with some high-resolution TEM micrographs of a cemented carbide cutting tooledge, prepared by using a Focused Ion Beam.Irrespective of sliding conditions, severe metallic wear of the adhesive type results in a surfacelayer, the structure of which is totally different from that of the original bulk material. Theoutermost surface layer displays a nano-crystalline structure followed by a textured layer inwhich the original grains are heavily deformed. For carbon steels, the nano-crystalline layeroften represents untempered martensite.During the wear process, oxide fragments and wear particles from the counter-material may alsobe mixed into the surface layer.The consequence for all metallic materials is that severe wear generates a hard superficial layer.For carbon steels, the hardness of the outermost layer may well exceed 1000 HV. The hardeningmechanisms are well known to a metallurgist and consist of grain refinement, deformationhardening through dislocation generation and tangling, solute hardening (martensite in carbonsteels) and second phase or particle strengthening through intermixing.Consequently, the wear process generates a surface layer on metallic materials that has a muchhigher wear resistance than the original material. This was also demonstrated in one of theexperiments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 26, no 1, 3-16 p.
Keyword [en]
Adhesive wear, metallic materials, metallographic structures, electron microscopy
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-13255OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-13255DiVA: diva2:41025
Available from: 2008-01-22 Created: 2008-01-22 Last updated: 2011-05-10Bibliographically approved

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Hogmark, StureJacobson, Staffan

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