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Pregnancy planning in Sweden: a pilot study among 270 women attending antenatal clinics
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). (Essén)
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2011 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 4, 408-412 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

Health status and lifestyle before and at the time of conception could affect the health of both mother and child, but there is a lack of knowledge about the degree to which pregnancies are planned. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether and how women plan their pregnancies.

Material and methods

The main outcome measures were use of timetables, ovulation tests and lifestyle changes. Women (n = 322) visiting four antenatal clinics were asked to fill out a questionnaire (participation rate = 83.9%, n = 270).

Results

Three of four pregnancies (n = 202) were very or rather well planned, whereas 4.4% (n = 12) were totally unplanned. During the planning period, 37.1% (n = 100) made up a timetable for getting pregnant, 23% (n = 62) used ovulation tests, 20.7% (n = 56) took folic acid and 10.4% (n = 28) changed alcohol consumption.

Conclusion

Although a majority of these women had planned pregnancies, only one in five had taken folic acid during the planning period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 90, no 4, 408-412 p.
Keyword [en]
Pregnancy planning, ovulation test, lifestyle change, folic acid, abortion
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-152943DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0412.2010.01055.xISI: 000289515500018PubMedID: 21306316OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-152943DiVA: diva2:414512
Available from: 2011-05-03 Created: 2011-05-03 Last updated: 2017-01-25Bibliographically approved

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Tydén, TanjaStern, JennyNydahl, MargarethaBerglund, AnnaLarsson, MargaretaRosenblad, AndreasAarts, Clara

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Tydén, TanjaStern, JennyNydahl, MargarethaBerglund, AnnaLarsson, MargaretaRosenblad, AndreasAarts, Clara
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Caring SciencesDepartment of Food, Nutrition and DieteticsInternational Maternal and Child Health (IMCH)Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland
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Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
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