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Colonization with potentially pathogenic respiratory tract bacteria: a household study
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
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1989 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 7, no 4, 203-209 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A group of 235 persons (180 adults and 55 children 0-15 years old) recorded symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection daily during two three-month periods (autumn 1986 and spring 1987). Samples for culture were taken from the nasopharynx and throat once during each period. Fifteen per cent of asymptomatic subjects harboured respiratory pathogens in the nasopharynx, as did 28% of those subjects with minor respiratory tract infections and 46% of those with more severe respiratory tract infections. Of children up to seven years of age, 58% were colonized with potential respiratory pathogens, which is important to keep in mind when evaluating culture reports from young children. Adults living with young children were colonized significantly more often than other adults. Branhamella catarrhalis was the most common pathogen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1989. Vol. 7, no 4, 203-209 p.
Keyword [en]
Upper respiratory tract infection, nasopharyngeal colonization, respiratory pathogens, Branhamella catarrhalis
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-153150PubMedID: 2516640OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-153150DiVA: diva2:415374
Available from: 2011-05-06 Created: 2011-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Eriksson, Margaretha

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