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Rapid population divergence linked with co-variation between coloration and sexual display in strawberry poison frogs
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5553-2691
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
2011 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 65, no 5, 1271-1282 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The likelihood of speciation is assumed to increase when sexually selected traits diverge together with ecologically important traits. According to sexual selection theory, the evolution of exaggerated display behavior is driven by increased mating success, but limited by natural selection, for example, through predation. However, the evolution of aposematic coloration (i.e., an ecologically important trait) could relieve the evolution of exaggerated display behavior from the bound of predation, resulting in joint divergence in aposematic coloration and sexual display behavior between populations. We tested this idea by examining conspicuousness, using color contrasts between individuals and their native backgrounds, and sexual display of 118 males from genetically diverged populations of the Strawberry poison frog, Dendrobates pumilio. Our results show that the level of conspicuousness of the population predicts the sexual display behavior of males. Males from conspicuous populations used more exposed calling sites. We argue that changes in aposematic coloration may rapidly cause not only postmating isolation due to poorly adapted hybrids, but also premating isolation through shifts in mating behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 65, no 5, 1271-1282 p.
Keyword [en]
Aposematism, natural selection, Oophaga pumilio, population differentiation, sexual selection, speciation
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-153586DOI: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01210.xISI: 000289893000005PubMedID: 21166789OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-153586DiVA: diva2:417132
Available from: 2011-05-16 Created: 2011-05-16 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Aposematism, Crypsis and Population Differentiation in the Strawberry Poison Frog
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aposematism, Crypsis and Population Differentiation in the Strawberry Poison Frog
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Evolutionary transitions between the two major predator avoidance strategies aposematism and crypsis are expected to be associated with changes in many important traits of animals. However, empirical studies on populations experiencing ongoing or recent transitions between these strategies are rare. This thesis investigates the co-evolution of traits among populations of the Strawberry poison frog D.pumilio in Bocas del Toro, Panama. I found that all investigated populations were genetically distinct but that colour and pattern did not correlate with genetic or geographic distance, which suggests that selection needs to be invoked to explain the observed variation. Based on the chromatic contrast between frog dorsal colour and the natural habitat substrates used by the frogs, the populations were defined as bright or dull coloured. I found that frogs from bright coloured populations were larger. This is expected if aposematism is enhanced by large signals while crypsis is enhanced by small size. Further, individuals from bright coloured populations had a coarser black dorsal pattern, which is expected if crypsis is impaired by a bold pattern. The importance of pattern coarseness was confirmed by an avian detection experiment showing that coarse patterned dark green prey were more easily detected than dark green prey without pattern or with fine pattern. I put forward the hypothesis that enhanced protection, gained by aposematism, may affect behaviours that influence dispersal and pairing patterns. Indeed, males from bright coloured populations displayed at more exposed sites and showed a tendency to be more explorative and aggressive. In summary, my results show that the bright and dull coloured populations most likely represent an aposematic and a cryptic strategy, respectively. Furthermore, I show that evolutionary changes between aposematism and crypsis can be associated with coevolution of both morphology and behaviour. I argue that this coevolution may increase the likelihood of both pre- and post-zygotic reproductive isolation. This is because greater phenotypic differences between populations increase the likelihood of selection against badly adapted migrants and hybrids with intermediate traits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2012. 43 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 956
Keyword
co-evolution, population divergence, natural selection, sexual selection, warning colouration, Oophaga pumilio, Dendrobates pumilio, aggression, explorative behaviour, colour patterns
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Zoology Ecology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-175240 (URN)978-91-554-8432-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-09-28, Zootissalen, Villavägen 9, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-09-06 Created: 2012-06-04 Last updated: 2013-01-22

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Rogell, BjörnQvarnström, Anna

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