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Acute sleep deprivation reduces energy expenditure in healthy men
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.ORCID iD: 000-0002-8911-4068
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2011 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 93, no 6, 1229-1236 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Epidemiologic evidence indicates that chronic sleep curtailment increases risk of developing obesity, but the mechanisms behind this relation are largely unknown.

Objective

We examined the influence of a single night of total sleep deprivation on morning energy expenditures and food intakes in healthy humans.

Design

According to a balanced crossover design, we examined 14 normal-weight male subjects on 2 occasions during a regular 24-h sleep-wake cycle (including 8 h of nocturnal sleep) and a 24-h period of continuous wakefulness. On the morning after regular sleep and total sleep deprivation, resting and postprandial energy expenditures were assessed by indirect calorimetry, and the free-choice food intake from an opulent buffet was tested in the late afternoon at the end of the experiment. Circulating concentrations of ghrelin, leptin, norepinephrine, cortisol, thyreotropin, glucose, and insulin were repeatedly measured over the entire 24-h session.

Results

In comparison with normal sleep, resting and postprandial energy expenditures assessed on the subsequent morning were significantly reduced after sleep deprivation by approximate to 5% and 20%, respectively (P < 0.05 and P < 0.0001). Nocturnal wakefulness increased morning plasma ghrelin concentrations (P < 0.02) and nocturnal and daytime circulating concentrations of thyreotropin, cortisol, and norepinephrine (P < 0.05) as well as morning postprandial plasma glucose concentrations (P < 0.05). Changes in food intakes were variable, and no differences between wake and sleep conditions were detected.

Conclusion

Our findings show that one night of sleep deprivation acutely reduces energy expenditure in healthy men, which suggests that sleep contributes to the acute regulation of daytime energy expenditure in humans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 93, no 6, 1229-1236 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-154681DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.110.006460ISI: 000290796700009PubMedID: 21471283OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-154681DiVA: diva2:421712
Available from: 2011-06-09 Created: 2011-06-09 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Benedict, ChristianSchiöth, Helgi Birgir

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