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Impact of forestry practices on fitness correlates and population productivity in an open-nesting bird species
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population and Conservation Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population and Conservation Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population and Conservation Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population and Conservation Biology.
2007 (English)In: Conservation Biology, ISSN 0888-8892, E-ISSN 1523-1739, Vol. 21, no 3, 767-774 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the boreal forests of Fennoscandia, over 99% of forest area has been altered by forestry practices, which has created forest with age structures and stand characteristics that differ from primary forest stands. Although many researchers have investigated how forestry affects species abundance, few have assessed how forestry practices affect fitness correlates of species living in altered habitats, and this has negatively affected management efforts. We experimentally addressed the effect of standard forestry practices on fitness correlates of an open-nesting, long-lived bird species typical to boreal forests of Eurasia, the Siberian Jay (Perisoreus infaustus). We used a before-after comparison of reproductive data on the level of territories and found that standard forestry practices had a strong negative effect on the breeding success of jays. Both partial thinning of territories and partial clearcutting of territories reduced future breeding success by a factor of 0.35. Forestry practices reduced territory occupancy. Thus, over the 15 years of the study, productivity of the affected population declined over 50% as a result of territory abandonment and reduced breeding success. Results of previous studies on Siberian Jays suggest that the strong effect of forest thinning on fitness is explained by the fact that most common predators of nests and adults are visually oriented and thus thinning makes prey and nests more visible to predators. The consequences of thinning we observed are likely to apply to a wide range of species that rely on understory to provide visual protection from predators. Thus, our results are important for the development of effective conservation management protocols and for the refinement of thinning practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 21, no 3, 767-774 p.
Keyword [en]
Clearcutting, Habitat fragmentation, Perisoreus infaustus, Population viability, Siberian Jay, Thinning
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-14661DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2007.00675.xISI: 000246843200022PubMedID: 17531054OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-14661DiVA: diva2:42432
Available from: 2008-01-31 Created: 2008-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Effects of Habitat Quality on Behavioural Decisions and Population Dynamics in the Siberian Jay
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Habitat Quality on Behavioural Decisions and Population Dynamics in the Siberian Jay
2006 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The dynamics of natural populations may be influenced by a variety of factors, ranging from feeding interference and territoriality to the risk of predation and climatic effects. The relative influence of these factors may be contingent upon the quality of the habitat in which individuals reside. A factor that can largely affect population dynamics and that often covaries with habitat structure is predation risk. However, the combined effect of habitat and predation risk can vary according to the social context and intrinsic characteristics that affect individual behavioural responses. This thesis investigates the effects of habitat quality at the level of the population and the individual, and examines how it relates to the above factors in Siberian jays (Perisoreus infaustus), a territorial, group-living species in which the main cause of mortality is predation. The results demonstrate a strong effect of habitat on survival, reproduction and behaviour. Mortality was generally higher in open areas and managed forests and reproductive success decreased after forest management. Breeding females were more sensitive to environmental factors than males, possibly because of higher reproductive costs. Estimates of spatial demography suggested that there were more sinks than sources, and that they were located in open, managed forests. Behavioural decisions confirmed that open forests were associated with higher predation risks. However, decisions depended on social context; immigrants took highest risks and were the recipients of most aggression, largely an effect of social subordination. Also, parents provide their offspring with benefits that are withheld from immigrants. As a result, first-year survival was higher in retained offspring. Investigating the effects of multi-scale habitat quality on individual behaviour and population dynamics has generated an increased understanding of the effects of forest management on the dynamics of this population. This approach should facilitate development of an effective conservation management policy for this species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2006. 45 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 174
Keyword
Biology, Perisoreus infaustus, relatedness, delayed dispersal, predation risk, foraging, trade-off, demography, source-sink dynamics, forest structure, Biologi
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-6835 (URN)91-554-6553-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2006-05-12, Zootissalen, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Norbyvägen 9, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2006-04-20 Created: 2006-04-20 Last updated: 2010-03-16Bibliographically approved

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Griesser, MichaelNystrand, MagdalenaEkman, Jan

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