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The Home Environment of Japanese Female University Students: Association with Respiratory Health and Allergy
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
2011 (English)In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 20, no 3, 369-376 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A study was undertaken to determine the association between the home environment along with the respiratory and allergy symptoms reported among female university students in Japan (N = 153). A multiple logistic regression was applied for the determination and the study was controlled based on the age of the students, whether the student smokes and history of asthma/allergy suffering in parents. The characteristics of the population were: 15.7% are diagnosed asthma, 56.9% suffered pollen allergy, 15.7% cat allergy, 11.1% dog allergy, 25.0% wheeze in breathing, 24.2% suffered daytime breathlessness and 9.3% suffered nocturnal attacks of breathlessness. Evaluated characteristics were: 41.2% had a pet at home, 21.6% environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), 20.9% current dampness or moulds, 6.6% recent indoor painting, 7.2% new floor material, and 56.2% window condensation at home in winter. Wheeze was more common in concrete houses (OR = 3.33; p < 0.05) and homes with water leakage and moulds infestation in the last 5 years (OR = 3.75; p < 0.05), window condensation (OR = 2.93; p < 0.05) and ETS (OR = 3.04; p < 0.05). Nocturnal breathlessness was related to current building dampness (OR = 7.48; p < 0.05), in particular to floor dampness. Furry pet allergy was more common in newer (p < 0.05) and newly painted homes (OR = 6.59; p < 0.05). Airway infections were more common in homes with new floor material (OR = 4.19; p < 0.05). In conclusion, asthma, airway infections and allergies were common among female university students and related to home environmental exposures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 20, no 3, 369-376 p.
Keyword [en]
Asthma, Atopic sensitisation, Japan, Building dampness, Indoor painting, University students
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-156245DOI: 10.1177/1420326X11403194ISI: 000292322800010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-156245DiVA: diva2:431390
Available from: 2011-07-19 Created: 2011-07-18 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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