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Imaging of disease dynamics during meningococcal sepsis
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
2007 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 2, no 2, e241- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen that causes septicemia and meningitis with high mortality. The disease progression is rapid and much remains unknown about the disease process. The understanding of disease development is crucial for development of novel therapeutic strategies and vaccines against meningococcal disease. The use of bioluminescent imaging combined with a mouse disease model allowed us to investigate the progression of meningococcal sepsis over time. Injection of bacteria in blood demonstrated waves of bacterial clearance and growth, which selected for Opa-expressing bacteria, indicating the importance of this bacterial protein. Further, N. meningitidis accumulated in the thyroid gland, while thyroid hormone T4 levels decreased. Bacteria reached the mucosal surfaces of the upper respiratory tract, which required expression of the meningococcal PilC1 adhesin. Surprisingly, PilC1 was dispensable for meningococcal growth in blood and for crossing of the blood-brain barrier, indicating that the major role of PilC1 is to interact with mucosal surfaces. This in vivo study reveals disease dynamics and organ targeting during meningococcal disease and presents a potent tool for further investigations of meningococcal pathogenesis and vaccines in vivo. This might lead to development of new strategies to improve the outcome of meningococcal disease in human patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 2, no 2, e241- p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-15846DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0000241ISI: 000207444500020PubMedID: 17311106OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-15846DiVA: diva2:43617
Available from: 2008-03-10 Created: 2008-03-10 Last updated: 2011-01-14Bibliographically approved

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Sjölinder, HongJonsson, Ann-Beth

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