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Daily Eating Events among Co-living and Single-Living, Diseased Older Men
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
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2008 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 12, no 3, 176-182 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To analyse, describe and compare the frequency and energy intake of eating events, including specific food items, among diseased older men living in ordinary housing. Design: Descriptive and explorative. Setting: Interviews were performed in the participants' home. Participants: Thirty-five co-living and 26 single-living men, 64-88 years of age. Participants had one of three chronic diseases associated with difficulties in buying and preparing food and with difficulties related to the meal situation: Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis or stroke. Measurements: A repeated 24-h recall was used to assess food intake and meal patterns. Results: Eating events were distributed over a 24-h period. Co-living men had a higher (p=0.001) number of eating events/day; both hot and cold eating events were consumed more frequently. There was no difference between groups concerning energy intake. Co-living men more often had hot eating events cooked from raw ingredients (p=0.001) and a greater mix of vegetables/roots (p=0.003) included in such eating events. Conclusion: Single-living men may constitute a vulnerable group from a nutritional perspective, while co-living men, besides the pleasure of eating with another person, seem to get support with food and eating events from their partners. Hence, the group of single-living men, particularly those with a disability, should receive particular attention with regard to possible food-related difficulties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 12, no 3, 176-182 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-15980DOI: 10.1007/BF02982615ISI: 000254428000003PubMedID: 18309437OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-15980DiVA: diva2:43751
Available from: 2008-03-28 Created: 2008-03-28 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Food in older men with somatic diseases: Eating habits and approaches to food-related activities
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food in older men with somatic diseases: Eating habits and approaches to food-related activities
2009 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The overall aim was to improve the knowledge and understanding of eating habits of older men with somatic diseases, and the men's perceptions about managing food-related habits, such as grocery shopping and cooking. A total of 67 men between 64 and 89 years of age were visited in their homes on two occasions with 1-2 weeks in between. The participants were diagnosed with one of the three diseases Parkinson’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or stroke. A food survey, with repeated 24-h recall, was used to assess food intake and meal patterns. Interviews with 18 participants were conducted with open-ended questions. The interviews were further analysed with a thematic framework approach.The findings showed that eating events were distributed over a 24-h period.Further, co-living men had a significantly larger number of eating events over the day (p=0.001). No differences in daily energy intake were observed between co-living and single-living men. Co-living men’s hot eating events were compared with those of single-living men more often cooked from fresh ingredients (p=0.001), including a greater mix of vegetables/roots (p=0.003).Thematic analysis revealed three different approaches to food-related activities(FRA), namely ‘Cooking as a pleasure’, describing joy in cooking; ‘Cooking as a need’, indicating no habits or skills in cooking; and ‘Food is served’, that is, being served meals by a partner. The men's approaches to FRA were affected in particular by gender-related roles, but also by changed life circumstances, activity limitations, personal interests, and a wish to maintain continuity and independence. Further adaptive strategies were used among the men in attempts to maintain continuity and independence in FRA. In conclusion, single-living older men, especially those with activity limitations, were identified as being a vulnerable group from a nutritional perspective. Further, health care efforts in promoting FRA should preferably be individualised with respect to the older man’s approach to these activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, 2009. 35 p.
Keyword
actvities of daily living, arthritis rheumatoid, cookery, meal patterns, men, nutrition, older people, Parkinson disease, stroke
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-106429 (URN)
Presentation
2009-06-10, Föreläsningssalen, Sjukhusvägen 14, Uppsala, 09:15 (Swedish)
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-06-24 Created: 2009-06-23 Last updated: 2011-06-13Bibliographically approved

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Kullberg, KerstinÅberg, Anna Cristina

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