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Effects of prenatal food and micronutrient supplementation on infant development: a randomized trial from the Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions, Matlab (MINIMat) study
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Internationell barnhälsa och nutrition/Persson)
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2008 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, Vol. 87, no 3, 704-711 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Few data exist for the effects of multiple micronutrient (MM) or food supplementation to undernourished pregnant women on their offsprings' development. Objective: We aimed to compare the effects on infant development of early (8 - 10 wk gestation) or usual (approximate to 17 wk gestation) supplementation with food and MM, 30 mg Fe + 400 mu g folate, or 60 mg Fe + 400 mu g folate. Design: A large, randomized, controlled trial of pregnancy supplementation was conducted in Bangladesh. A subsample of infants (n = 2853) were assessed on 2 problem-solving tests (support and cover tests), the motor index of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, and Wolke's behavior ratings at 7 mo of age. Results: There were no significant effects of any intervention in the group as a whole. However, infants of undernourished mothers [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) < 18.5] who received early food supplementation performed slightly but significantly (P = 0.035) better on the support test than did infants of mothers who received usual food supplementation (z score: 0.17; 95% CI 0.01, 0.33). There were no benefits in infants of higher-BMI mothers (P = 0.024 for BMI x food interaction). Children of low-BMI mothers who received MMs had slightly better motor scores (z score: 0.28; 95% CL 0.08, 0.48) and activity ratings (z score: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.037, 0.45) than did those who received 30 mg Fe + 400 mu g folate, whereas other children did not benefit (P = 0.05 for both motor scores and BMI x micronutrients and for activity and BMI x micronutrients). Conclusions: Small benefits from early food and MM supplementation were found in infants of low-BMI but not of high-BMI mothers. However, the benefits were of doubtful functional importance, and longer follow-up is required to determine programmatic implications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 87, no 3, 704-711 p.
Keyword [en]
maternal nutrition, pregnancy, food and micronutrient supplementation, problem-solving test, psychomotor development, Bangladesh, infants, body mass index
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-16200ISI: 000253927700024PubMedID: 18326610OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-16200DiVA: diva2:43971
Available from: 2008-05-13 Created: 2008-05-13Bibliographically approved

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Persson, Lars AkeEkström, Eva-Charlotte
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