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Genetically determined variation in stress responsiveness in rainbow trout: behavior and neurobiology
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
2007 (English)In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 70, no 4, 227-238 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is becoming increasingly recognized that the diversity in stressors, their intensity, predictability and the context in which they are experienced, will result in behavioral and physiological responses just as diverse. In addition, stress responses are characterized by individual variations where the physiological and behavioral reactions are associated in such a manner that distinct stress coping styles encompassing suites of correlated traits can be identified. These are often referred to as proactive and reactive stress coping styles. Proactive coping is characterized by more aggression, higher general activity and higher sympathetic activation, whereas reactive coping is characterized by immobility, lack of initiative and a higher parasympathetic/hypothalamic activation. Stable coping styles appear to coexist within populations, and these strategies appear to be largely innate. Moreover, the physiological and behavioral traits of coping styles appear to be heritable. These stress coping styles have proven to play a major role in competitive ability and subsequent social position in different species of vertebrates. However, there are also studies showing that social position can affect parameters encompassing the stress coping style of individuals. In this regard it is important, but not always easy, to distinguish between causes and effects of behavioral and physiological responses to stressors. The question raised is to what extent and rigidness stress coping styles are guided by genetic factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 70, no 4, 227-238 p.
Keyword [en]
Aggression, Coping style, Cortisol, HPI-axis, Monoamines, Salmonids, Serotonin
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-16269DOI: 10.1159/000105486ISI: 000249537200003PubMedID: 17914254OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-16269DiVA: diva2:44040
Available from: 2008-05-15 Created: 2008-05-15 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Schjolden, JoachimWinberg, Svante

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