uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Increased H(2) production in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp strain PCC 6803 by redirecting the electron supply via genetic engineering of the nitrate assimilation pathway
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
Show others and affiliations
2011 (English)In: Metabolic engineering, ISSN 1096-7176, E-ISSN 1096-7184, Vol. 13, no 5, 610-616 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 contains a single bidirectional NiFe-Hox-hydrogenase, which evolves hydrogen under certain environmental conditions. The nitrate assimilation pathway is a potential competing pathway that may reduce the electron flow to the hydrogenase and thereby limit hydrogen production. To improve H(2) production, the nitrate assimilation pathway was disrupted by genetic engineering to redirect the electron flow towards the Hox-hydrogenase. Mutant strains disrupted in either nitrate reductase (Delta narB) or nitrite reductase (Delta nirA) or both nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase (Delta narB:Delta nirA) were constructed and tested for their ability to produce hydrogen. H(2) production and Hox-hydrogenase activities in all the mutant strains were higher than those in wild-type. Highest H(2) production was observed in the Delta narB:Delta nirA strain. Small changes were observed for Hox-hydrogenase enzyme activities and only minor changes in transcript levels of hoxH and hoxY were not correlated with H(2) production. The results suggest that the high rate of H(2) production observed in the Delta narB:Delta nirA strain of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the result of redirecting the electron supply from the nitrate assimilation pathway, through genetic engineering, towards the Hox-hydrogenase.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 13, no 5, 610-616 p.
Keyword [en]
Hox-hydrogenase, Hydrogen production, Nitrate reductase, Nitrite reductase, Synechocystis PCC 6803
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-158890DOI: 10.1016/j.ymben.2011.07.004ISI: 000294291200017OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-158890DiVA: diva2:441954
Available from: 2011-09-20 Created: 2011-09-19 Last updated: 2017-12-08

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Lindblad, Peter

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindblad, Peter
By organisation
Molecular Biomimetics
In the same journal
Metabolic engineering
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 826 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf