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Multilocus Genotyping of Human Giardia Isolates Suggests Limited Zoonotic Transmission and Association between Assemblage B and Flatulence in Children
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2011 (English)In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, ISSN 1935-2727, Vol. 5, no 8, e1262- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Giardia intestinalis is one of the most common diarrhea-related parasites in humans, where infection ranges from asymptomatic to acute or chronic disease. G. intestinalis consists of eight genetically distinct genotypes or assemblages, designated A-H, and assemblages A and B can infect humans. Giardiasis has been classified as a possible zoonotic disease but the role of animals in human disease transmission still needs to be proven. We tried to link different assemblages and sub-assemblages of G. intestinalis isolates from Swedish human patients to clinical symptoms and zoonotic transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings: Multilocus sequence-based genotyping of 207 human Giardia isolates using three gene loci: beta-giardin, glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), and triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) was combined with assemblage-specific tpi PCRs. This analysis identified 73 patients infected with assemblage A, 128 with assemblage B, and six with mixed assemblages A+B. Multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were easily determined for the assemblage A isolates, and most patients with this genotype had apparently been infected through anthroponotic transmission. However, we also found evidence of limited zoonotic transmission of Giardia in Sweden, since a few domestic human infections involved the same assemblage A MLGs previously reported in Swedish cats and ruminants. Assemblage B was detected more frequently than assemblage A and it was also more common in patients with suspected treatment failure. However, a large genetic variability made determination of assemblage B MLGs problematic. Correlation between symptoms and assemblages was found only for flatulence, which was significantly more common in children less than six years of age infected with assemblage B. Conclusions/Significance: This study shows that certain assemblage A subtypes are potentially zoonotic and that flatulence is connected to assemblage B infections in young children. Determination of MLGs from assemblages A and B can be a valuable tool in outbreak situations and to help identify possible zoonotic transmission.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 5, no 8, e1262- p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159060DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001262ISI: 000294479800017OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-159060DiVA: diva2:442791
Available from: 2011-09-22 Created: 2011-09-21 Last updated: 2014-05-14Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, Jan O.

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